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Frequently Asked Questions

Explore our most commonly asked questions or click on a category to learn more.

  • Why should I choose AdjusterPro?

    Our team is passionate about providing the best insurance training courses and online classroom experience in the industry. We are committed to helping you succeed at every step of your adjusting career.

    At AdjusterPro, we believe in serving our customers with transparency, honesty, and adhering to the Golden Rule, treating others as we would want to be treated.

    Building our company upon these principles, here are a few other ways we differentiate from the competition:

    • We offer over 170 courses – the most comprehensive catalog in the country
    • Our simple, engaging online training was created to help you comprehend and retain information
    • Keeping your license compliant is simple with our convenient continuing education courses
    • You’ll receive honest answers from our dedicated (real-people) customer engagement team
    • 50 states strong: we offer a path to licensing for every state
    • Over 50,000 people have trained with us
    • 8 of the country’s top 10 insurance carriers train with AdjusterPro
    • 98.4% customer satisfaction rating
    • AdjusterPro is more than just online courses. We’re the nation’s go-to resource for all things adjuster. Whether it’s licensing, reciprocity, CE, networking, tips of the trade, or career advice, we’ve got you covered.

    Whether you are just starting to explore the insurance claims industry, a Fortune 500 company, or are a veteran adjuster looking for additional training, we are here to help you reach your goals and achieve success.

  • How do I become a claims adjuster?

    In most states, you need to be licensed to adjust claims. The process, steps, and fees vary a bit by state but generally follow the same pattern. Get your home state, or Designated Home State (DHS) license if you live in a nonlicensing state. You need to take and pass your state adjuster exam, and submit a license application.

    To see detailed instructions for your specific state, visit Adjuster Licensing

  • How much money does an insurance adjuster make?

    The amount of money an adjuster makes is largely dependent on how efficient they are at their job. Independent adjusters are paid on a ‘fee schedule’ where they receive a percentage of each of the claims closed. The percentage offered can vary based on a few factors: how often they work, the employer, the adjuster’s experience level, and the demand for adjusters at any given time.

    Large scale disasters, like hurricanes Harvey and Irma, can create competition for adjusters so IA firms will alter their pay percentages to try and attract the best workforce. During these periods, experienced adjusters can make $100,000 in just a few months. But remember, you are an independent contractor and these periods are not predictable or reliable. You need to know how to manage the boons and droughts to remain successful long term. The current average salary for an adjuster is roughly $63,000 but again, that varies. The top 10% of earners make closer to $100,000 annually, even in down years. Adjusters who won’t travel, get too picky with assignments, or only work a few months a year earn closer to $40,000.

  • What is Xactimate?

    Xactimate, created by Xactware, is the industry’s most popular claims adjusting software. Adjusters no longer have to write claims by hand, reference pricing books, and use calculators to perform a complete estimate. The Xactimate platform has automated most of those tasks, enabling the adjuster to perform inspections and adjustments much faster.

    The software was designed specifically for construction professionals, restoration specialists, and claims adjusters. Xactimate helps adjusters:

    • Save time and money in creating estimates
    • Create more accurate, detailed, and professional-looking estimates
    • Access the most up-to-date and reliable pricing information
    • Sketch complicated roofs, rooms, layouts, and structures
    • Automate and streamline your estimating processes
    • Organize and manage your projects
    • Overcome language barriers in preparing estimates

    See a complete list of features at Xactimate.com

  • Can I use a tablet to take my course? What about a smartphone?

    Our courses were built to work on all iPads and tablets. Layouts, scrolling, and displays will vary depending on the device you have, and performance will vary depending on the browser the device uses. Our courses are fully HTML5 compatible so you can experience the course on your smartphone as well.

    This makes working on your course possible wherever you go!

    However, for the best experience, we still recommend a desktop or laptop. This is especially important when taking your exam as you’ll want to make sure you have reliable wifi and are in a location where you can concentrate.

  • Do I need to know Xactimate?

    We’ve trained tens of thousands of adjusters over the last decade, and it’s become clear that proficiency in Xactimate is the single most important technical skill a new adjuster must acquire. In fact, “are you familiar with Xactimate?” is one of the most frequently asked questions in interviews and on applications. Knowing your way around the software not only sets you ahead of the curve in the employment line, it means you can get to work adjusting claims immediately once you’re deployed. You’ll be able to work through inspections and adjustments faster and with more accuracy, which is truly money in your pocket.

  • What if my home state doesn’t license? What is a DHS license?

    If you live in a non-licensing state, you should obtain a “Designated Home State” or DHS license. A DHS license basically works just like having your home state license and is vital if you want to work any claims outside of your non-licensing state. If you live in Kansas for example, you can adjust claims there without a license, but you can’t go work claims in Florida or Texas. While a host of different states offer a DHS license, we recommend obtaining the Florida 70-20 Nonresident DHS license. It offers great reciprocity and Florida has the quickest application turnaround time in the country.

    States that do not currently license adjusters: Colorado, District of Columbia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

  • What is reciprocity?

    Reciprocity, or reciprocal licensing privileges, allows a licensed adjuster to obtain another state(s) license without having to pass that specific state’s exam. Thank goodness, right? Once you have your home state or DHS license, you can apply for other state licenses through reciprocity.

    It’s not automatic – you will need to complete the required paperwork and submit the licensing fees but most licensing states are now reciprocal with each other. There are some caveats – New York and California do not reciprocate with any other state for example. To learn what states will offer you a reciprocal license, visit the AdjusterPro Reciprocity Map and click on your state.

  • What will happen once testing facilities reopen?

    Once PSI Testing centers reopen, provisional license holders will need to pass the state exam to convert to an Idaho adjuster license. This course will fully prepare you to pass the state exam as well. It will remain available in your virtual classroom should you like to revisit topics or study before your PSI exam.

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Minnesota?

    Minnesota adjusters must complete 24 hours of insurance continuing education before their license renewal deadline, and at least 12 of those hours must not be sponsored by, offered by, or affiliated with an insurance company or its agents.

    The 24 hours must include 3 hours of ethics-related continuing education. You may not repeat a continuing education course for credit during the same licensing period.

    Before registering for any CE course, you should ensure that the course provider is active and in good standing with the Minnesota Commerce Department and that the MCD has approved the course for continuing education credit.

    You can see approved continuing education and renew your license at Sircon.

  • What are the renewal and CE requirements for Massachusetts appraisers?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Massachusetts appraisers. Licenses expire annually on June 30th, regardless of issue date.

    Renewal applications are sent out in early March. If an appraiser wants to renew his license he must fill out the application and mail it to the board by June 1, along with the $50 renewal fee. The board will verify the information on the application and if it is complete, they will issue a certificate of annual registration, making the appraiser’s license current and up to date.

  • What are the appraiser licensing fees for Massachusetts?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $149
    • Application Fee: $100 (includes part 1 and part 2 of the exam)
    • Renewal Fee: $50
  • How do I get a Massachusetts Auto Appraiser 16-60 License?

    To obtain your Massachusetts Motor Vehicle Damage Appraiser 16-60 license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Massachusetts MVDA Licensing Requirements
    – Be at least 18 years old
    – Be a person of good moral character
    – Have a high school diploma or possess satisfactory relevant work experience, as determined by the Appraiser Licensing Board
    – Have at least three months of experience completing appraisals under the close supervision of a licensed appraiser

    2. Take a Massachusetts Licensing Board approved Damage Appraiser Training Course

    3. Submit the following paperwork, along with your application to the Massachusetts Appraiser Licensing Board. The Board will notify you when your application has been approved.
    – A work experience letter from a licensed Massachusetts appraiser with whom you have worked for a period of at least three months. This letter must be signed by the appraiser and his seal affixed.
    – A copy of certification received from a board approved MVDA Course Exception: Two years of practical work experience writing appraisals may be substituted for the required course work.
    – If you have had any convictions, a transcript from the courts identifying the offense(s) and a letter of explanation should be included.
    MA MVDA Appraiser Application, along with a check for $100.00 made payable to the Commonwealth of Massachusetts for application processing and examination.
    Send the paperwork and application to:
    The Auto Damage Appraiser Licensing Board
    1000 Washington St, Suite 810
    Boston, MA 02118-6200.

    4. While not required, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Massachusetts Motor Vehicle Damage Appraiser Exam Prep course to ensure passing the written portion of the state exam

    5. After your application has been approved, register for and pass the Massachusetts MVDA State Exam
    Register online with Prometric

    6. After successfully completing your written examination, you will be notified by the Board how to complete Part 2 – Vehicle Appraisal Examination

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Maine?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Maine adjusters. Resident adjuster renewal dates are 10/01/even years. Non-resident adjuster renewal dates are 01/01/even years.

    You can renew your license online through NIPR. You may also renew your license manually by following the directions on the renewal notice you will receive from the state.

  • What are the total licensing fees for Hawaii?

    • AdjusterPro Exam Prep Course: $179
    • Exam Fee: $75
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $17
    • License Application & Renewal Fees: See Hawaii Fee Schedule
  • What does reciprocity look like for South Carolina Auto Appraisers?

    South Carolina grants reciprocal licensing privileges to any non-resident applicant who holds an appraiser license in his home state. If the applicant’s license status cannot be verified, he must provide a legible certification from his home state’s Department of Insurance. This certification must be less than 90 days old and prove the applicant is a licensed appraiser who has passed the state exam.

    If the applicant’s home state does not require an appraiser exam, then he may submit a certification from another state’s Department of Insurance where he is licensed and has passed an appraiser exam.

  • How do I get a South Carolina Auto Appraiser 19-15 license?

    To obtain your South Carolina Auto Appraiser License, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic South Carolina Auto Appraiser Licensing Requirements
      • Be at least 18 years old
    2. While South Carolina does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s SC Auto Appraiser Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the South Carolina State Exam
      • Register online with PSI
    4. Provide an original SLED Report from South Carolina Law Enforcement Division
    5. Submit an application using NIPR.
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at SC License Verification. Your National Producer Number (NPN) will be used as the South Carolina license number. You can search for your National Producer Number at: https://nipr.com/PacNpnSearch.htm

    Additional licensing details are available on the South Carolina Department of Insurance Appraiser page.

    South Carolina requires you to hold both an adjuster license and an auto appraiser license to handle auto claims. Click on the insurance adjuster tab above for more information on the adjuster license.

  • What are the total licensing fees for Florida Customer Service Representative (4-40)?

    • Florida Customer Service Representative Course: $299
    • Initial Licensing and Application Fee: $50
    • License ID Fee: $5
    • Fingerprint Fee: $48.55
    • No renewal fee
  • How do I get a Florida Customer Service Representative (4-40) License?

    To obtain your Florida Customer Service Representative (4-40) license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Florida Customer Service Representative (4-40) Licensing Requirements
      1. Be a natural person at least 18 years of age
      2. Be a resident of the State of Florida
      3. Be a United States citizen or legal alien who possesses a work authorization from the United States Immigration and Naturalization Services
    2. Complete the required Florida Customer Service Representative Course with state exam through AdjusterPro
    3. Process and submit Fingerprints according to instructions at Florida Department of Financial Services (FLDFS) Fingerprinting Requirements
    4. Submit application through MyProfile
      Applicants concerned with criminal background questions on the application can view a list of Disqualifying Crimes provided by the state
    5. If required, submit Proof of Citizenship Documentation
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued by logging into MyProfile

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information at FLDFS Licensing Information.

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Florida Public Adjusters?

    Resident Public Adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years by the end of their birth month.

    There is no license renewal required for Florida adjusters provided the licensee is properly appointed when applicable. Failure to complete continuing education requirements may result in cancellation of an appointment that could lead to termination of the license. License will also expire if more than 48 months lapse without an appointment. Login to MyProfile to update your appointment.

  • What does reciprocity look like for Florida Public Adjusters?

    Florida grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in a state that has a reciprocal agreement with Florida. AZ, CA, HI, NM, and NY do not have reciprocal agreements with Florida.

    Detailed reciprocity information is available at FLDFS Public Adjuster Reciprocity.

  • What are the total licensing fees for Florida Public Adjusters?

    • Florida Certified Adjuster Designation Course: $299
    • Initial Licensing and Application Fee: $50
    • License ID Fee: $5
    • Fingerprint Fee: $48.55
    • Public Adjuster State Exam: $42
  • How do I get a Florida Public Adjuster license?

    To obtain your Florida Public Adjuster license, first get your 6-20 Certified Adjuster license:

    1. Meet the basic Florida Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be a natural person at least 18 years of age
      2. Be a resident of the State of Florida
      3. Be a United States citizen or legal alien who possesses a work authorization from the United States Immigration and Naturalization Services
    2. Complete the required Florida Certified Designation Course with state exam through AdjusterPro
    3. Process and submit Fingerprints according to instructions at Florida Department of Financial Services (FLDFS) Fingerprinting Requirements
    4. Submit Proof of Citizenship Documentation
    5. Submit application through MyProfile
      Applicants concerned with criminal background questions on the application can view a list of Disqualifying Crimes provided by the state
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued by logging into MyProfile

    Next, follow the instructions to obtain the 3-20 license

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Florida?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include 5 hours of Law and Ethics Update.

    Florida independent adjusters may NOT receive credit for any approved course taken twice in two years. You cannot take the same course within a two-year period, regardless of compliance cycle.

    There is no license renewal required for Florida adjusters provided the licensee is properly appointed when applicable. Failure to complete continuing education requirements may result in cancellation of an appointment that could lead to termination of the license. The license will also expire if more than 48 months lapse without an appointment. Login to MyProfile to update your appointment.

    AdjusterPro offers over 40 hours of continuing education for Florida adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • Florida Department of Financial Services contact information

    Website: https://www.myfloridacfo.com/Division/Agents/Licensure/

    Mailing Address:
    Florida Department of Financial Services
    Bureau of Licensing, Room 419
    200 East Gaines Street
    Tallahassee, FL 32399-0319

    Phone: 850-413-3137
    Email: agentlicensing@myfloridacfo.com

  • What does reciprocity look like for Florida?

    Florida grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in a state that has a reciprocal agreement with Florida. AZ, CA, HI, NM, and NY do not have reciprocal agreements with Florida. You can see all the details regarding reciprocity for Florida adjusters on our Reciprocity Map.

    More information is also available at FLDFS Adjuster Reciprocity.

  • What are the total licensing fees for Florida?

    • Florida Certified Adjuster Designation Course: $299
    • Initial Licensing and Application Fee: $50
    • License ID Fee: $5
    • Fingerprint Fee: $48.55
    • No renewal fee
    • Independent Adjuster Appointment Fee: $60
  • How do I get a reciprocal license to adjust claims in Puerto Rico?

    Adjusters who hold a resident home state adjusters license can get a reciprocal license for Puerto Rico by applying for it on the NIPR Website.

    It’s important to note that Puerto Rico does not accept designated home state (DHS) licenses.

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Nevada?

    An Independent Adjuster license is issued for a three (3) year term in Nevada.

    During the license term, each adjuster must complete 24 hours of education. Three (3) of the 24 hours must be in ethics.

    The license is renewable at the end of the month on the third anniversary of the issuance of the license.

    Renew your license through Sircon Nevada.

  • What are the Florida 4-40 license continuing education and renewal requirements?

    You must renew your Florida 4-40 License every two years. While there is no renewal fee, license-holders do need to complete 10 hours of continuing education every renewal period and submit proof to the state in order to stay compliant.

    The 10-hours of CE must consist of the 5-hour Florida Law and Ethics Update and an additional 5 hours of elective credits.

    AdjusterPro offers a state-approved 5-hr Florida Law & Ethics Update course, as well as a 4-40 License CE Package that will completely satisfy your CE requirements.

    To see complete details on the 4-40 license, visit the Florida Department of Insurance 4-40 Website. You can also contact the department at (850) 413-3137 or agentlicensing@myfloridacfo.com.

  • Is there opportunity for career growth with the 4-40 license?

    The simple answer: YES!

    Today, insurance is a part of every aspect of our lives. The industry is one of the largest in the world and employs millions of people in hundreds of different jobs and roles. No matter what your interest, there is likely a position in the insurance industry to suit your talents.

    On a smaller scale, the 4-40 License is a great way to break into this booming industry. Working as a customer rep will help you learn about the industry and insurance policies and give you real-world experience should you decide to become a full-fledged agent. Once you have taken our CIR Designation course and worked for 1 year as a licensed 4-40 rep, you qualify to apply for the 2-20 general agent license. In comparison, those who do not have their 4-40 license must take a 200-hour course and pass the state exam before applying.

  • How much will the 4-40 license cost in total?

    Once you’ve completed our Florida CIR Course and passed the included exam, you’ll need to pay the following state application fees.
    – Licensing and Application Fee: $50
    – License ID Fee: $5
    – Fingerprint Processing Fee: $48.55

  • What is the application process for the 4-40 license?

    To apply for your Florida 4-40 license, you must complete a state-approved prerequisite course, usually referred to as a “designation.” Our designation course is labeled CIR which stands for Customer Insurance Representative.

    Once you complete our CIR course, you’re ready to apply for your 4-40 License.
    – Submit your application for licensing through MyProfile
    – Process and submit fingerprints: Fingerprinting Requirements
    – Submit Proof of Citizenship Documentation
    – Log-in to MyProfile to see if your license has been issued

    For complete licensing details, see FLDFS Licensing Information.

  • What is the typical role for a customer representative?

    As a customer rep, you’ll handle many of the day-to-day tasks for the agent or agency. You might discuss policies and coverages with customers, answer their questions, handle personal information of clients and potential clients, or make policy changes. Customer Reps can also sell insurance, as long as they are under the supervision of a licensed general agent. Other responsibilities include developing good relationships with policyholders, upselling coverage, and encouraging customers to refer friends and family.

    Customer Reps are often seen as the ‘face’ of the agency since they communicate with policyholders and would-be policyholders on a regular basis. They can have a huge impact on customer satisfaction and retention, (the main goal of any insurer) so they are incredibly important. Customer Reps can make commissions, however, commissions cannot total more than half of their annual pay.

  • Who needs a Florida 4-40 license?

    This license is required to work for most insurance agents and agencies in Florida. It’s designed for salaried employees of insurance agencies, not agents or brokers who earn the majority of their pay from sales commissions. The 4-40 license allows you to make quotes, explain policies to clients, and provide valuable assistance to sales agents.

  • What are the renewal and CE requirements for New York auto appraisers?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for New York auto appraisers. Licenses are valid for two years and will expire on December 31st in each even-numbered year.

    Renew your license at NY License Renewal.

  • What are the auto appraiser licensing fees for New York?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $149
    • Exam Fee: $33
    • Licensing Fee: $100
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $87
    • Bond: Typically less than $100 a year
    • License Renewal Fee: $50
  • How do I get New York Motor Vehicle Damage Appraiser (MVDA) Series 17-71 License?

    To obtain your New York MVDA license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic New York MVDA Licensing Requirements
      • Be at least 18 years old
      • Be trustworthy and competent
      • Never have been convicted of a felony or any crime involving fraud or dishonesty
    2. While New York does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing the AdjusterPro New York Motor Vehicle Damage Appraiser Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the New York Damage Appraiser State Exam
      • Register online with PSI
      • When asked to select a provider from the drop down menu, select 7777 Pre-Licensing Waived (because pre-licensing is not required for this license)
    4. Submit an application through the New York Department of Financial Service Application Instructions. We recommend waiting a week to submit your application in order for your exam to be processed
    5. You will also need to complete the following: (Detailed information on these items is covered in the application.)
      • Get your Fingerprints processed through IdentoGo
      • Submit five Certificates of Character
      • Provide a $1,000 bond to cover the licensing period
      • Include a Certificate of Good Conduct from the Board of Parole if you have committed a felony or crime involving fraudulent or dishonest practices

    Check to see if your license has been issued at NY License Search

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for New York?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for New York adjusters. Licenses are valid for two years and will expire on December 31st in each even-numbered year.

    Renew your license through NYDFS Login.

  • New York Department of Financial Services contact information

    Website: https://www.dfs.ny.gov/apps_and_licensing/agents_and_brokers/home

    Mailing Address:
    New York Department of Financial Services
    Licensing Bureau
    One Commerce Plaza,
    Albany, NY 12257

    Phone: 800-342-3736
    Email: licensing@dfs.ny.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for New York?

    New York does not grant reciprocal licenses for adjusters. To become a licensed adjuster and work claims in New York, you must pass the state exam.

  • What are the total licensing fees for New York?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $199
    • Exam Fee: $33
    • Licensing Fee: $100
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $87
    • Bond: Typically less than $100 a year
    • License Renewal Fee: $50
  • Pennsylvania Insurance Department contact information

    Website: http://www.insurance.pa.gov/Licensees/Pages/default.aspx

    Mailing Address:
    Pennsylvania Insurance Department
    Bureau of Licensing and Enforcement
    1209 Strawberry Square
    Harrisburg, PA 17120

    Phone: 717-787-3840
    Email: ra-in-compliance@pa.gov

  • What are the renewal and CE requirements for Pennsylvania appraisers?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Pennsylvania appraisers. Licenses expire on June 30 every year.

    Renew your license through NIPR or Sircon Pennsylvania.

  • What are the appraiser licensing fees for Pennsylvania?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $149
    • Exam Fee: $40
    • Licensing Fee: $55
    • License Renewal Fee: $55
  • How do I get Motor Vehicle Physical Damage Appraiser License in Pennsylvania?

    To obtain your Pennsylvania Series 16-20 Motor Vehicle Physical Damage Appraiser license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Pennsylvania Motor Vehicle Physical Damage Appraiser Licensing Requirements
      • Be at least 18 years old
      • Be trustworthy
      • Possess the appropriate experience or training in motor vehicle damage appraisal
    2. Complete an approved training course, such as AdjusterPro’s PA Damage Appraiser Exam Prep Course, or have six months of continuous experience related to this field
      • Fax or email training course completion certificate or proof of work experience to:
        Pennsylvania Insurance Department (PID)
        Email: ra-in-producer@state.pa.us
        Fax: 717-787-8553
    3. Register for and pass the Pennsylvania Motor Vehicle Physical Damage Appraiser Exam
      • Register online with PSI
      • When asked to select a provider from the drop down menu, select 99999 Other (because pre-licensing is not required for this license)
    4. Submit application using PA Motor Vehicle Physical Damage Appraiser Application and mail with your payment to:
      • Pennsylvania Insurance Department
        Bureau of Licensing & Enforcement
        1209 Strawberry Square
        Harrisburg, PA 17120
    5. Check to see if your license has been issued at PID Licensees

    Additional licensing information is available on the PID Website.

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Rhode Island?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Rhode Island adjusters.

    Renew your license with the state through NIPR.

  • How do I get auto appraiser license in Rhode Island?

    To obtain your Rhode Island Auto Appraiser License, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Rhode Island Auto Appraiser Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Obtain a Criminal Background Check
      3. Operate independently of any repair shop or car dealership
    2. While Rhode Island does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Rhode Island Auto Appraiser Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Rhode Island State Exam
      1. Register online with PearsonVue Rhode Island
    4. Obtain a Criminal Background Report from the Rhode Island Attorney General’s office by calling the office at 401-274-4400
    5. Submit an application through NIPR Rhode Island
    6. Submit a RI Employment Affidavit. This is only required if the applicant is not currently employed with an insurance company. An affidavit that matches the current employment status needs to be completed, notarized, and attached to application.
    7. Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS Rhode Island

    Additional licensing details are available at Rhode Island DOI Licensing.

    Rhode Island allows you to hold both an adjuster license and an auto appraiser license in order to handle both parts of an auto claim: the appraisal and the settlement. Click on the insurance adjuster tab above for more information.

  • What are the appraiser licensing fees for Rhode Island?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $149
    • Exam Fee: $90
    • Licensing Fee: $150
    • Background Check Fee: $5
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $15
    • License Renewal Fee: $150
  • What are the renewal and CE requirements for Rhode Island appraisers?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Rhode Island appraisers.

    Renew your license through SBS Rhode Island.

  • What are the renewal and CE requirements for South Carolina appraisers?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for South Carolina appraisers. Licenses are renewed in October of odd-numbered years.

    Renew your license at NIPR.

  • What are the appraiser licensing fees for South Carolina?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $149
    • Exam Fee: $45
    • Licensing Fee: $80
    • SLED Fee: $25
    • Renewal Fee: $80
  • What are the renewal and CE requirements for Vermont appraisers?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Vermont appraisers. The Department will send out renewal notices for existing licensees at the beginning of the even year.

    Renew your license through NIPR or Sircon Vermont.

  • What are the appraiser licensing fees for Vermont?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $149
    • Exam Fee: $73
    • Application Fee: $30
    • Licensing Fee: $120
  • How do I get my Vermont 14-37 Damage Appraiser License?

    To obtain your Vermont 14-37 Damage Appraiser license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Vermont Damage Appraiser Licensing Requirements
    a. Be at least 18 years old
    b. Be deemed competent, trustworthy, financially responsible, and of good personal and business reputation
    c. Meet the experience requirement through one of the following:
    – Have 2 years of experience in loss appraisal
    – Have completed an approved training program
    – Employed by and subject to the supervision of an appraiser who has been licensed at least 3 years in Vermont

    2. While Vermont does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Vermont Appraiser Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam

    3. Register for and pass the Vermont Damage Appraiser Exam
    – Register online with Prometric

    4. Submit application and test score report electronically through NIPR

    5. Check to see if your license has been issued at Vermont License Status

    Additional licensing details are available on the Vermont Auto Damage Appraiser Info page.

    Vermont allows you to hold both an adjuster license and an auto appraiser license in order to handle both parts of an auto claim: the appraisal and the settlement. Click on the insurance adjuster tab above for more information.

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for South Carolina?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for South Carolina adjusters. Adjuster licenses are renewed in August of odd-numbered years.

    Renew your license with the state at NIPR.

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Oregon?

    Beginning January 1, 2020, both resident and non-resident adjusters must complete 24 hours of continuing education prior to renewal, including 3 hours of Ethics.

    For a resident license, the education must also include 3 hours of Oregon law.

    The new CE requirement applies to any individual who has had the full 24 months to complete the continuing education. As such, the first licenses that this will apply to those are those issued or renewed on or after January 1, 2020, for all licenses that expire on January 31, 2021 or later.

    CE hours are due by the last day of the renewal month.

    Renew your license through NIPR.

    AdjusterPro offers over 40 hours of continuing education for Oregon adjusters, including state-approved Ethics and Oregon Law courses.  Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

     

     

  • What does reciprocity look like for Nevada?

    Nevada grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state or adjusters who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state requires an examination.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Nevada adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and type in Nevada. ​

  • Nevada Division of Insurance Contact Information

    Website: http://doi.nv.gov/Licensing/License_Types/Adjuster/

    Mailing Address:
    Nevada Division of Insurance
    1818 East College Pkway, Ste 103
    Carson City, NV 89706

    Phone: (775) 687-0700
    Fax: (775) 687-0797
    Email: insinfo@doi.nv.gov

  • What are the licensing fees for Nevada?

    • Exam Fee: $61
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $38.25
    • Licensing Fee: $185
    • License Renewal Fee: $75
  • What does reciprocity look like for Massachusetts?

    The MVDA license is not reciprocal with any state. To obtain your appraiser’s license, you must pass the 2-part state exam.

  • What are the licensing fees for Massachusetts?

    Fees:

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $149
    • Application Fee (includes part 1 & 2 of exam): $100
    • Renewal Fee: $50
  • Massachusetts Division of Insurance Contact Information

    Website: https://www.mass.gov/service-details/motor-vehicle-damage-appraiser

    Mailing Address:

    Massachusetts Division of Insurance

    Auto Damage Appraisers Licensing Board

    1000 Washington St, Suite 810

    Boston, MA 02118-6200

     

    Phone: 617-521-7448

    Fax: 617-753-6881

    Email: robert.hunter@massmail.state.ma.us

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Massachusetts?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Massachusetts appraisers. Licenses expire annually on June 30th, regardless of issue date. 

    Renewal applications are sent out in early March. If an appraiser wants to renew his license he must fill out the application and mail it to the board by June 1, along with the $50 renewal fee. The board will verify the information on the application and if it is complete, will issue a certificate of annual registration, making the appraiser’s license current and up to date.  

  • Wyoming Department of Insurance Contact Information

    Website: https://sites.google.com/a/wyo.gov/doi/licensing

    Mailing Address:
    Wyoming Department of Insurance
    106 East 6th Avenue
    Cheyenne, WY 82001

    Phone: 307-777-7401
    Fax: 307-777-2446
    Email: insurancelicensing@wyo.gov

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Wyoming?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics. Licenses renew every two years, on the last day of the licensee’s birthday month.

    Renew your license through NIPR or Sircon Wyoming.

    AdjusterPro offers over 24 hours of continuing education for Wyoming adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • What does reciprocity look like for Wyoming?

    Wyoming grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who hold a home state or Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as that state requires an exam, background and fingerprinting, and 24 hours of CE per renewal period. Due to these requirements, Wyoming does not offer reciprocity to adjusters from the following states: AL, AZ, CT, DE, GA, HI, ME, MI, MS, NV, NM, NY, OR, RI, SC, VT, WA, WV.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Wyoming adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Wyoming.

  • What are the total licensing fees for Wyoming?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $113
    • Licensing Fee: $100
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $39
    • License Renewal Fee: $100
    • CE Reporting Fee: $30
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for West Virginia?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for West Virginia adjusters. A West Virginia Adjuster license must be renewed each year on May 31st, regardless of when it was issued.

    Renew your license through NIPR.

  • West Virginia Offices of the Insurance Commissioner Contact Information:

    Website: https://www.wvinsurance.gov

    Mailing Address:
    West Virginia Offices of the Insurance Commissioner
    PO Box 50540
    Charleston, WV 25305

    Phone: 304-558-0610
    Fax: 304-558-4966
    Email: agent.licensing@wvinsurance.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for West Virginia?

    West Virginia grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state or who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as that state requires an examination and grants reciprocal licenses to WV adjusters.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to West Virginia adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select West Virginia. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for West Virginia?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $110
    • Licensing Fee: $25
    • License Renewal Fee: $25
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Washington?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Washington adjusters.

    Renew your license through the WOIC Service Portal.

  • Washington State Office of the Insurance Commissioner Contact Information

    Website: https://www.insurance.wa.gov/independent-adjuster

    Mailing Address:
    Office of the Insurance Commissioner
    Licensing Division
    P. O. Box 40257
    Olympia, WA 98504-0257

    Phone: 360-725-7144
    Fax: (360) 586-2019
    Email: Online Submission Form

  • What does reciprocity look like for Washington?

    Washington grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who hold a home state or Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as that state requires an examination and grants reciprocal licenses to Washington adjusters. Reciprocal licenses are not available for CA, HI, and NY.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Washington adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and type in Washington. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Washington?

    • Exam Fee: $49
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $32.50
    • Licensing Fee: $55
    • License Renewal Fee: $50
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Vermont?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Vermont adjusters. The license term is April 1st to March 21st of even years. Detailed renewal information is available on the VDFR Online Renewal page.

    Renew your license through NIPR or Sircon.

  • Vermont Department of Financial Regulation Contact Information

    Website: https://dfr.vermont.gov/industry/insurance/producer-and-individual-licensing 

    Mailing Address:
    Vermont Department of Financial Regulation
    89 Main Street
    Montpelier, VT 05620

    Phone: 802-828-3302 or 800-964-1784 (toll free)
    Fax: 802-828-1633
    Email: dfr.insuranceinfo@vermont.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Vermont?

    Vermont grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state, or adjusters who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state requires an examination. 

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Vermont adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Vermont. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Vermont?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $87
    • Application Fee: $30
    • Licensing Fee: $120
    • License Renewal Fee: $120
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Utah?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics. Adjuster licenses expire every two years on the last day of the licensee’s birth month. Detailed CE information is available on the UID License Renewal and Reinstatement page.

    Renew your license through NIPR or Sircon

    AdjusterPro offers over 24 hours of continuing education for Utah adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • Utah Insurance Department Contact Information

    Website: https://insurance.utah.gov/licensee/producers

    Mailing Address:
    Utah Insurance Department
    Suite 3110 State Office
    450 North State Street
    Salt Lake City, UT 84114

    Phone: 801-538-3855
    Fax: 801-538-3830
    Email: licensing.uid@utah.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Utah?

    Utah grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state. Utah will also accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license for adjusters whose home state does not license. 

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Utah adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Utah. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Utah?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $59
    • Licensing Fee: $75
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $28.25
    • License Renewal Fee: $75
  • Texas Department of Insurance Contact Information

    Website: http://www.tdi.texas.gov/licensing/agent/index.html

    Mailing Address:
    Texas Department of Insurance
    Agent & Adjuster Licensing Office
    PO Box 149104
    Austin, TX 78714-9104

    Phone: 512-676-6500
    Fax: 512-490-1029
    Email: license@tdi.texas.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Texas?

    Texas grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state or who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as that state grants reciprocal licenses to Texas adjusters. CA, HI, and NY do not offer reciprocal licenses to Texas adjusters. 

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Texas adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Texas. ​

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Texas?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include at least hours of 2 hours of Ethics. Licenses renew every two years, on the last day of the licensee’s birthday month. Detailed CE information is available on the TDI Continuing Education FAQ page. 

    If you’ve had your license for less than a full two years, Texas has prorated CE requirements.

    Renew your license through TDI Licensing Renewal

    AdjusterPro offers over 40 hours of continuing education for Texas adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • What are the total licensing fees for Texas?

    • AdjusterPro Course with State Exam: $279
    • License Application Fee: $50
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $70
    • License Renewal Fee: $50
  • What does reciprocity look like for South Carolina?

    South Carolina grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state, or adjusters who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state requires an examination. 

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to South Carolina adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select South Carolina. ​

  • South Carolina Department of Insurance Contact Information

    Website: http://doi.sc.gov/355/Adjuster

    Mailing Address:
    South Carolina Department of Insurance
    Post Office Box 100105
    Columbia, SC 29202

    Phone: 803-737-6095
    Fax: 803-737-6100
    Email: info@doi.sc.gov

  • What are the total licensing fees for South Carolina?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $45
    • SLED Report Fee: $25
    • Licensing Fee: $80
    • License Renewal Fee: $80
  • Rhode Island Department of Business Regulation Contact Information

    Website: https://dbr.ri.gov/divisions/insurance/producersadjusters.php

    Mailing Address:
    Insurance Regulation Division
    1511 Pontiac Ave
    Cranston, RI 02920

    Phone: 401-462-9520
    Fax: 401-462-9602
    Email: dbr.insurance@dbr.ri.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Rhode Island?

    Rhode Island grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state or adjusters who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state requires an examination.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Rhode Island adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Rhode Island. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Rhode Island?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $90
    • Licensing Fee: $250 (This fee is waived for any honorably discharged veteran by submitting a DD-214 Form)
    • Background Check Fee: $40
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $15
    • License Renewal Fee: $250
  • Oregon Division of Financial Regulation Contact Information

    Website: https://dfr.oregon.gov/business/licensing/insurance/license-types/Pages/adjusters.aspx

    Mailing Address:
    Oregon Division of Financial Regulation
    P.O. Box 14480
    Salem, OR 97309-0405

    Phone: 503-947-7981
    Fax: 503-378-4351​​​​​​
    Email: web.insagent@oregon.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Oregon?

    Oregon grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state. Oregon will also accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license for adjusters whose home state does not license.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Oregon adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Oregon. ​

  • What are the licensing fees for Oregon?

    • Exam Fee: $45
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $55
    • Licensing Fee: $75
    • License Renewal Fee: $45
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for North Carolina?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years, including 3 hours in Ethics. In the first compliance period and every other compliance period after that (every four years), adjusters must also complete 3 hours in Flood Insurance:

    • 3 hours of Ethics every two years
    • 3 hours of Flood Insurance for the first compliance cycle, and every four years after that

    The date of compliance for CE varies according to the month and year of birth of the licensee. 

    Review NCDOI CE Information Chart to determine your compliance date.

    Renew your license through NIPR.

    AdjusterPro offers 40 hours of continuing education for North Carolina adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • North Carolina Department of Insurance contact Information

    Website: https://www.ncdoi.gov/licensees/agent-and-adjuster-licensing

    Mailing Address:
    Agent Services
    1204 Mail Service Center
    Raleigh, NC 27699-1204

    Phone: 919-807-6800
    Fax: 919-715-3794
    Email: ASD@ncdoi.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for North Carolina?

    North Carolina grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state. North Carolina will also accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license from an adjuster whose home state does not license.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to North Carolina adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select North Carolina. ​

  • What are the licensing fees for North Carolina?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $46
    • Registration Fee: $50
    • Application Processing Fee: $44
    • License Fee: $75
    • NIPR Application Transaction Fee: $5
    • License Renewal Processing Fee: $34
    • License Renewal Fee: $75
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for New Mexico?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics.

    New Mexico independent adjusters may NOT receive credit for any approved course taken twice in three years. You cannot take the same course within a three-year period, regardless of compliance cycle.

    Adjusters that work Flood claims are required to take 3 hours of continuing education related to Flood Insurance by February 27, 2019. Detailed CE information is available on the New Mexico OSI CE page.

    Renew your license through NIPR.

    AdjusterPro offers over 24 hours of continuing education for New Mexico adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • New Mexico Office of Superintendent of Insurance Contact Information

    Website: New Mexico Office of Superintendent of Insurance

    Mailing Address:
    Producer Licensing Bureau
    NM Office of Superintendent of Insurance
    PO Box 1689
    Santa Fe, NM 87504

    Phone: 505-827-4349
    Email: agents.licensing@state.nm.us

  • What does reciprocity look like for New Mexico?

    New Mexico grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state. New Mexico will also accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license from an adjuster whose home state does not license.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to New Mexico adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select New Mexico. ​

  • What are the licensing fees for New Mexico?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $75
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $44
    • Bond Fee: Varies depending on credit rating and other factors.
    • Licensing Fee: $30
    • License Renewal Fee: $1 per credit hour
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for New Hampshire?

    Effective January 1, 2020, New Hampshire will require 24 hours of CE every two years. The 24 hours must include 3 hours of Ethics. (Previous requirement was 20 hours of continuing education every 2 years.)

    Renew your license through NIPR.

    AdjusterPro offers over 24 hours of continuing education for New Hampshire adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • What does reciprocity look like for New Hampshire?

    New Hampshire grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state. New Hampshire will also accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license from an adjuster whose home state does not license. 

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to New Hampshire adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select New Hampshire. ​

  • New Hampshire Insurance Department Contact Information

    Website: https://www.nh.gov/insurance/producers/adjusterslicenses.htm

    Mailing Address:
    New Hampshire Insurance Department
    21 South Fruit Street, Suite 14
    Concord, NH 03301

    Phone: 603-271-0203
    Fax: 603-271-7029
    Email: producerquestions@ins.nh.gov

  • What are the total licensing fees for New Hampshire?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: P&C Adjuster $100
    • Licensing Fee: $75
    • License Renewal Fee: $75
  • What does reciprocity look like for Montana?

    Montana grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who hold a license in their home state. Montana will also accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license for adjusters whose home state does not license. 

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Montana adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Montana. ​

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Montana?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include:

    • 3 credit hours of Ethics
    • 1 credit hour of Legislative Updates

    Renew your license through NIPR.

    AdjusterPro offers over 40 hours of continuing education for Montana adjusters, including a state-approved Legislative Update Course. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • Montana Insurance Department Contact Information

    Website: http://csimt.gov/insurance/licensing/

    Mailing Address:
    Montana Commission of Securities and Insurance
    840 Helena Ave, Helena
    Montana 59601

    Phone: 406-444-2040
    Fax: 406-444-3497

  • What are the total licensing fees for Montana?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $59
    • Licensing Fee: $50
    • Fingerprinting and Background Check: $54     
    • License Renewal Fee: $100
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Mississippi?

    • Initial licenses expire on the last day of the licensee’s birth month in the following year, but no less than 13 months from the date of issue. After that, the license will expire every two years on the last day of the adjuster’s birth month.

    • Resident adjusters will be required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two-year license term. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics.

    • For initial licenses in effect for 13-18 months: 12 hours of continuing education is required each year prior to the expiration date.

    • For initial licenses in effect for 19-24 months: 24 hours of continuing education including three hours of ethics.

    • Review Mississippi’s CE Chart detailing how many CE hours are required for your license.

    • Renew your license through Sircon.

    • AdjusterPro offers over 24 hours of continuing education for Mississippi adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • What are the total licensing fees for Mississippi?

    • AdjusterPro Prelicensing Course Fee: $199
    • Exam Fee: $52
    • Initial Licensing & Application Fee: $100
    • License Renewal Fee: $50
  • What does reciprocity look like for Mississippi?

    Mississippi grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed their home state or adjusters who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state requires an examination.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Mississippi adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Mississippi. ​

  • Mississippi Department of Insurance Contact Information

    Website: http://www.mid.ms.gov/licensing/adjuster-licensing.aspx

    Mailing Address:
    Mississippi Insurance Department
    PO Box 79
    Jackson, MS 39205-0079

    Phone: 601-359-3582
    Fax: 601-359-1951
    Email: licensing@mid.ms.gov

  • Minnesota Commerce Department – Insurance Division Contact Information

    Website: https://mn.gov/commerce/licensees/insurance/adjusters.jsp

    Mailing Address:
    Minnesota Commerce Department-Licensing
    85 7th Place East, Suite 500
    St. Paul, MN 55101

    Phone: 651-539-1599
    Email: licensing.commerce@state.mn.us

  • What does reciprocity look like for Minnesota?

    Minnesota grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state. Minnesota will also accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license for adjusters whose home state does not license.  

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Minnesota adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Minnesota. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Minnesota?

    • Exam Fee: $25
    • Licensing Fee: $50
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $48.75    
    • License Renewal Fee: $60
    • Technology Surcharge: $25
  • Michigan Department of Insurance & Financial Services Contact Information

    Website: http://www.michigan.gov/difs/0,5269,7-303-22535—,00.html

    Mailing Address:
    Michigan DIFS
    PO Box 30220
    Lansing, MI 48909-7720

    Phone: (517) 373-0220
    Fax: (517) 335-4978
    Email: difs-licensing@michigan.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Michigan?

    Michigan grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state or adjusters who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state requires an examination.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Michigan adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Michigan. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Michigan?

    • AdjusterPro Exam Prep Course: $179
    • Exam Fee: $40
    • Licensing Fee: $15
    • NIPR Processing Fee: Residents $5
    • License Renewal Fee: $5
  • Maine Bureau of Insurance Contact Information

    Website: http://www.maine.gov/pfr/insurance/regulated/individuals_bus_entities/adjusters/index.html

     

    Mailing Address: 

    Department of Professional & Financial Regulation

    Bureau of Insurance

    #34 State House Station

    Augusta, ME 04333-0034

     

    Phone: 207-624-8475

    Fax: 207-624-8599

    Email: Insurance.PFR@maine.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Maine?

    Maine grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state. Maine will also accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license for adjusters whose home state does not license.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Maine adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Maine. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Maine?

    Fees: 

    • AdjusterPro Exam Prep Course: $179
    • Exam Fee: $77
    • Licensing Fee: $30
    • Application Fee: $15
    • Renewal Fee: $30 (+$15 if you renew through NIPR)

    Nonresident licensing fees differ from resident fees.

  • Which Florida license do I need?

    There are 4 basic adjuster license types in Florida you need to know: the 6-20, 7-20, 70-20, and 3-20.

    Our Florida Certified Adjuster Pre-Licensing Course fulfills the state’s prerequisites for the 6-20, 7-20, and 70-20 adjuster licenses. Students who complete our course and pass the included exam are exempt from the state adjuster exam and qualified to apply for their license. You’ll choose which license you need on your Florida adjuster application.

    6-20 Resident All-Lines Adjuster License
    This license is for any resident of Florida looking to be a staff or independent adjuster.

    7-20 Nonresident All-Lines Adjuster License
    This license is for any nonresident of Florida looking to handle Florida insurance claims. This is what you’ll apply for if you’re a licensed adjuster in another state and wanting reciprocal licensing privileges in Florida.

    70-20 Nonresident Designated Home State (DHS) License
    This license is for nonresidents of Florida who live in states that do not license insurance adjusters. If you live in Illinois for example, you don’t need an adjuster license to handle claims in that state. However, if you want to handle claims in any licensing state, or be employed by an IA Firm and deployed to handle disaster claims, you will still need a license. To solve this issue, the industry created the Designated Home State (DHS) License. If you live in a nonlicensing state, the Florida 70-20 license is our recommended DHS license.

    3-20 Public Adjuster License
    The 3-20 license is exclusively for public adjusters. The process for becoming a Public Adjuster in Florida is a bit more complex than the previous license designations, but the first step is to obtain the 6-20 license listed above. After receiving the 6-20 license, you must train under another public adjuster for 6 months and then pass the 3-20 exam to become a licensed public adjuster.

    4-40 Customer Representative License
    While this isn’t an adjuster license, we wanted to mention it to help avoid any confusion. The 4-40 Customer Representative License is for Florida residents who work in insurance agencies or for insurance agents.

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Louisiana?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics. Adjuster licenses renew on the last day of the licensee’s birth month. Even-numbered licenses renew in even years and odd-numbered licenses renew in odd years.

    Renew your license with the state through NIPR.

    AdjusterPro offers over 40 hours of state-approved continuing education for Louisiana adjusters, including a 2-hour Ethics course. Adjusters needing an additional ethics credit can take our Insurance Principles course which includes 1 credit hour of ethics.

    Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • Louisiana Department of Insurance contact information

    Website: http://www.ldi.louisiana.gov/industry/producer-adjuster/license-application

    Mailing Address:
    Louisiana Department of Insurance
    PO Box 94214
    Baton Rouge, LA 70804

    Phone: 225-342-0860

  • What does reciprocity look like for Louisiana?

    Louisiana grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state or adjusters who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state requires an examination.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Louisiana adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Louisiana

  • What are the total licensing fees for Louisiana?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $15
    • Licensing Fee: $55
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $58
    • License Renewal Fee: $50
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Kentucky?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics. CE must be completed the last day of your birth month, odd or even-numbered years, depending on the year you were born.

    Renew your license through NIPR.

    We do not currently offer continuing education courses for Kentucky.

  • Kentucky Department of Insurance contact information

    Website: http://insurance.ky.gov/PPC/

    Mailing Address:
    Agent Licensing Division
    P.O. Box 517,
    Frankfort, Kentucky 40602-0517

    Phone: 502-564-6004
    Fax: 502-564-6030
    Email: DOI.AgentLicensingMail@ky.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Kentucky?

    Kentucky grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state or adjusters who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state requires an examination. 

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Kentucky adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Kentucky.

  • What are the total licensing fees for Kentucky?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $50
    • Licensing Fee: $50
    • Background Check Fee: $20
    • License Renewal Fee: $50
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Indiana?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. License renewal occurs on the last day of the individual’s birth month. Detailed renewal information is available on the IDOI Renewal Requirements page.

    Renew your license through Sircon.

    AdjusterPro offers over 40 hours of continuing education for Indiana adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • Indiana Department of Insurance contact information

    Website: https://www.in.gov/idoi/2695.htm

    Mailing Address:
    Indiana Department of Insurance
    311 West Washington Street,
    Indianapolis, Indiana 46204-2787

    Phone: 317-232-2385
    Fax: 317-234-5882
    Email: agentlicensing@idoi.in.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Indiana?

    Indiana grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state or who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, except residents of CA, HI, NY, and RI.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Indiana adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Indiana. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Indiana?

    • Indiana Course and Exam: $379
    • License Fee: $40 (Nonresidents $90)
    • Renewal Fee: $40 (Nonresidents $90)
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Idaho?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics. Independent adjuster licenses are good for two years and expire on the last day of the licensee’s birth month.

    Renew your license through IDOI Renewal Information.

    AdjusterPro offers over 24 hours of continuing education for Idaho adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • Idaho Department of Insurance contact information

    Website: http://www.doi.idaho.gov/licensing/IA/

    Mailing Address:
    Idaho Department of Insurance
    PO Box 83720
    Boise, ID 83720

    Phone: 208-334-4250
    Fax: 208-334-4398
    Email: Use IDOI Contact Form

  • What does reciprocity look like for Idaho?

    Idaho grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state or adjusters who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state requires an examination.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Idaho adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Idaho.

  • What are the total licensing fees for Idaho?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $60
    • Licensing Fee: $80
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $70
    • License Renewal Fee: $60
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Hawaii?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Hawaii adjusters.

    Renew your license through HDCCA License Extension/Renewal website.

  • Hawaii Department of Commerce & Consumer Affairs contact information

    Insurance Division

    Website: http://cca.hawaii.gov/ins/producers/instructions_insurance_license/

    Mailing Address:
    Hawaii Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs
    335 Merchant Street, Room 213
    Honolulu, Hawaii 96813

    Phone: 1-808-586-2790
    Fax: 1-808-586-2806
    Email: inslic@dcca.hawaii.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Hawaii?

    Hawaii does not grant reciprocal licenses. To become a licensed adjuster in Hawaii, you must pass the state exam.

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Georgia?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics. Continuing education requirements must be completed biennially on or before the last day of the licensee’s birth month. Detailed CE information is available on Georgia Continuing Education Requirements page.

    Renew your license through Georgia Online Renewals.

    AdjusterPro offers over 40 hours of continuing education for Georgia adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • Georgia Office of Insurance contact information

    Website: https://www.oci.ga.gov/Agents/Home.aspx

    Mailing Address:
    Georgia Office of Insurance and Fire Safety Commission
    Two Martin Luther King,
    Jr. Drive, West Tower, Suite 704,
    Atlanta, Georgia 30334

    Phone: 404-656-2070
    Fax: 404-657-8542
    Email: agents@oci.ga.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Georgia?

    Georgia grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state or adjusters who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state requires an examination.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Georgia adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Georgia. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Georgia?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $199
    • Georgia Adjuster Exam Fee: $90
    • License Application Fee: $115
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $48.25
    • License Renewal Fee: $100
  • How do I renew my license for Florida?

  • What are the renewal and CE requirements for Delaware appraisers?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Delaware appraisers.

    Renew your license through SBS Delaware.

  • What are the appraiser licensing fees for Delaware?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $149
    • Exam Fee: $90
    • Licensing Fee: $100
    • State Background Check: $52
    • Federal Background Check: $69
    • License Renewal Fee: $100
  • How do I get auto appraiser license in Delaware?

    To obtain your Delaware Motor Vehicle Appraiser license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Delaware Motor Vehicle Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
    2. While Delaware does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing the AdjusterPro Delaware Motor Vehicle Appraiser Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Delaware Appraiser State Exam
    4. Submit application through NIPR
    5. Delaware requires applicants to submit both a state and a federal criminal history background check. Both reports should be faxed to 302-736-7906 within 90 days of obtaining fingerprints and submitting your application.
      1. Instructions for the Delaware state criminal history check
      2. Instructions for the FBI criminal history check
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS Delaware

    Additional licensing details are available on the Delaware Licensing FAQ page.

    Delaware allows you to hold both an adjuster license and an auto appraiser license in order to handle both parts of an auto claim: the appraisal and the settlement. Click on the adjuster compliance tab above for more information

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Delaware?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 12 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 12 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics. Detailed CE information is available on the DDOI CE FAQ page.

    Renew your license through SBS Delaware.

    AdjusterPro offers over 24 hours of continuing education for Delaware adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • Delaware Department of Insurance contact information

    Website: http://insurance.delaware.gov/divisions/renewlicense/#LicProc

    Mailing Address:
    Delaware Department of Insurance
    841 Silver Lake Blvd
    Dover, Delaware 19904

    Phone: 302-674-7390
    Fax: 302-736-7906
    Email: licensing@state.de.us

  • What does reciprocity look like for Delaware?

    Delaware grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state or who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state grants reciprocal licenses to Delaware adjusters.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Delaware adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Delaware. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Delaware?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $90
    • Licensing Fee: $100
    • State Background Check: $52
    • Federal Background Check: $69
    • License Renewal Fee: $100
  • What are the renewal and CE requirements for Connecticut appraisers?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Connecticut appraisers. Licenses expire on June 30 of each odd numbered year. Complete renewal details are available on the CID Renewal FAQ Page.

    Renew your license through NIPR.

  • What are the appraiser licensing fees for Connecticut?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $149
    • Exam Fee: $94
    • Licensing Fee: $130
    • License Renewal Fee: $80
  • How do I get auto appraiser license in Connecticut?

    To obtain your Connecticut Auto Appraiser 18-16 license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Connecticut Auto Appraiser Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be financially responsible and of good moral character
    2. While Connecticut does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Connecticut Motor Vehicle Damage Appraiser Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the written state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Connecticut Appraiser Written Exam
      1. Register online with Prometric
    4. Pass the Connecticut Appraiser Practical Exam
      1. After passing the written exam, applicants are required to pass a practical exam by contacting:
        1. South End Auto Body, Inc.
          676 Cromwell Ave, Rocky Hill, CT 06067.
          Ph: (860) 529-7426
    5. After passing both exams, submit application through NIPR
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at CID Verify License Page

    Additional licensing details are available on the CID website.

    Connecticut allows you to hold both an adjuster license and an auto appraiser license in order to handle both parts of an auto claim: the appraisal and the settlement. Click on the adjuster compliance tab above for more information.

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Connecticut?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Connecticut adjusters. Licenses expire June 30 of each odd-numbered year. Detailed renewal information is available on the CID Renewal FAQ page.

    Renew your license through NIPR.

  • Connecticut Insurance Department contact information

    Website: https://portal.ct.gov/CID/Licensing/Licensing-General-Information

    Mailing Address:
    Connecticut Insurance Department
    Licensing Division
    PO Box 816
    Hartford, CT 06142

    Phone: 860-297-3849
    Fax: 860-566-3978
    Email: cid.licensing@ct.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Connecticut?

    Connecticut grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state, except CA, HI, and NY. Connecticut will also accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license for adjusters whose home state does not license.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Connecticut adjusters, visit our Connecticut Reciprocity Map. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Connecticut?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $34
    • Licensing Fee: $130
    • License Renewal Fee: $80
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for California?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics.

    Renew your license through CDI Licensing Renewal.

    AdjusterPro offers over 40 hours of continuing education for California adjusters, including a state-approved Ethics Course. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • California Department of Insurance contact information

    Website: https://www.insurance.ca.gov/0200-industry/0005-quick-guides/

    Mailing Address:
    California Department of Insurance
    Producer Licensing Bureau
    P.O. Box 1139
    Sacramento, CA 95812-1139

    Phone: 916-492-3085
    Email: Use CDI Contact Form

  • What does reciprocity look like for California?

    California does not grant reciprocal licenses. To become a licensed adjuster in California, you must pass the state exam.

  • What are the total licensing fees for California?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee:
      • $112 at a PSI Testing Site (21 sites located throughout state)
      • $79 at CDI Testing Site in Downtown Los Angeles
    • Exam Retake fee: $32
    • Fingerprint Fee (through PSI): $68.95 or
    • Fingerprint Fee (Through CDI): $59
    • License Application Fee: $79
    • Licensing Fee: $311
    • Bond Fee: Varies depending on credit rating and other factors
    • License Renewal Fee: $311
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Arkansas?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics. Arkansas adjusters may not take the same course more than once within a two-year period and receive CE credit.

    All licenses are issued or renewed for a period of two calendar years, and will expire on the last day of the licensee’s birth month in the calendar year of expiration. For first time licensees, the active license period may be 12 months to 24 months depending on when the license was issued.

    Renew your license through NIPR.

    AdjusterPro offers over 24 hours of continuing education for Arkansas adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • Arkansas Insurance Department contact information

    Website: https://www.insurance.arkansas.gov/pages/industry-regulation/licensing/

    Mailing Address:
    Arkansas Insurance Department
    1 Commerce Way, Suite 102
    Little Rock, AR 72202

    Phone: 501-371-2750
    Fax: 501-683-2604
    Email: insurance.license@arkansas.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Arkansas?

    Arkansas grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed their home state or adjusters who hold a Designated Home State (DHS) license, as long as the home or DHS state requires an examination.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Arkansas adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Arkansas.

  • What are the total licensing fees for Arkansas?

    • AdjusterPro Course and Exam Fee: $379
    • License Application Fee: $55
    • State Police Record Check Fee: $22
    • License Renewal Fee: $55
    • CE Filing Fee: $20
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Arizona?

    There is NO continuing education (CE) requirement for Arizona adjusters.

    Renew your license through NIPR.

  • Arizona Department of Insurance contact information

    Website: https://insurance.az.gov/producers/adjuster

    Mailing Address:
    Arizona Department of Insurance and Financial Institutions
    100 N. 15th Avenue, Suite 261
    Phoenix, Arizona 85007-2630

    Phone: 602-364-4457
    Fax: 602-364-4460
    Email: licensing@azinsurance.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Arizona?

    Arizona grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state. Arizona does not accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license so you must pass the Arizona state exam if you live in a non-licensing state.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Arizona adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Arizona. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Arizona?

    • AdjusterPro Course Fee: $179
    • Exam Fee: $49
    • Licensing Fee: $120
    • FBI Fingerprint Processing Fee: $22
    • License Renewal Fee: $120
  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Alaska?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every renewal period. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics. Licenses expire biennially on the last day of birth month.

    Renew your license through NIPR.

    AdjusterPro offers over 40 hours of continuing education for Alaska adjusters, including a state-approved Ethics Course. Courses can be purchased individually or as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements.

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Alabama?

    Resident insurance adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include at least 3 hours of Ethics. Adjuster Licenses are renewed biennially in accordance with their birth month.

    Renew your license through SBS Alabama.

    AdjusterPro offers over 40 hours of continuing education for Alabama adjusters. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • What are the continuing education and license renewal requirements for Oklahoma?

    Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. You may not take the same course more than once within any two-year period. The 24 hours must include:

    • 3 hours of Ethics
    • 2-hour OK Law Update
    • 1-hour Earthquake course (for property adjusters only)

    Renew your license through OKID Renewing a License.

    AdjusterPro offers over 40 hours of continuing education for Oklahoma adjusters, including a state-approved Legislative Update Course. Courses can be purchased as a bundle that will fulfill state requirements or individually.

  • Alaska Division of Insurance contact information

    Website: https://www.commerce.alaska.gov/web/ins/Producers.aspx

    Mailing Address:
    State of Alaska Department of Commerce

    550 W 7th AVE, STE 1535
    Anchorage, AK 99501-3587

    Phone: 907-269-8100
    Fax: 907-269-812507) 269-8125(907) 269-8125
    Email: license@alaska.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Alaska?

    Alaska grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state. Alaska does NOT accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license so you must pass the Alaska state exam if you live in a non-licensing state.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Alaska adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Alaska. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Alaska?

    • AdjusterPro Exam Prep Course: $179
    • Exam Fee: $89
    • Fingerprinting Fee: $51.50
    • Licensing Fee: $75
    • License Renewal Fee: $75
  • Alabama Department of Insurance contact information

    Website: http://www.aldoi.gov/Licensing/AdjusterReq.aspx

    Mailing Address:
    Alabama Department of Insurance
    PO Box 303351
    Montgomery, AL 36130

    Phone: 334-269-3550
    Fax: 334-241-4192
    Email: insdept@insurance.alabama.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Alabama?

    Alabama grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state, except CA, HI, and NY. Alabama will also accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license for adjusters whose home state does not license.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to AL adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Alabama. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Alabama?

    1. AdjusterPro Pre-licensing Course and State Exam Fee:
      • Alabama Property & Casualty with Workers’ Comp and Crop: $379
      • Alabama Property & Casualty: $300
      • Alabama Workers’ Compensation: $249
      • Alabama Crop: $249
    2. Total Initial License Fees: $110.00
    3. Fingerprinting Fee: $47
    4. License Renewal Fee: $80
  • Oklahoma Insurance Department contact information

    Website: https://www.ok.gov/oid/Licensing_and_Education/index.html

    Mailing Address:
    Oklahoma Insurance Department
    Five Corporate Plaza,
    3625 NW 56th Street, Suite 100,
    Oklahoma City, OK 73112-4511

    Phone: 405-521-3916
    Fax: 405-522-3642
    Email: licensing@oid.ok.gov

  • What does reciprocity look like for Oklahoma?

    Oklahoma grants reciprocal licenses to adjusters who are licensed in their home state, except CA, HI, NM, NV, & NY. Oklahoma will also accept a Designated Home State (DHS) license for adjusters whose home state does not license.

    To see what states will offer reciprocal licensing privileges to Oklahoma adjusters, visit our Reciprocity Map and select Oklahoma. ​

  • What are the total licensing fees for Oklahoma?

    • AdjusterPro Exam Prep Course: $179
    • Exam Fee: $40
    • Licensing Fee: $30 for one line of authority, $50 for two or more lines of authority
    • License Renewal Fee: $50
  • How do I get a Wyoming Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Wyoming Adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Wyoming Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be trustworthy and of good reputation
      3. Maintain an office accessible to the public which keeps the usual and customary records
    2. While Wyoming does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Wyoming Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Wyoming State Exam
      1. Register online with PearsonVue Wyoming
    4. Submit an application through NIPR or Sircon Wyoming
    5. Process and submit Fingerprints. A fingerprint packet will be provided by the Department of Insurance upon receipt of application and fees.
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at Sircon

    See complete licensing details, including non-resident information on the Wyoming Department of Insurance website.

  • How do I get a Washington Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Washington Adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Washington Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be trustworthy and competent
      3. Meet the experience requirement through one of the following:
        • Successfully complete the Associate in Claims (AIC) Program
        • Adjuster Trainee Program
        • Complete 12 consecutive months (part of which is in the current or previous year) working as a full-time, salaried insurance company or managing general agent (MGA) adjuster, verified by the insurance company or MGA in writing on business letterhead.
    2. Prepare for the state exam using AdjusterPro’s Washington Adjuster Exam Prep course
    3. Register for and pass the Washington State Exam
      1. Register online with PSI
    4. Process and submit Fingerprints according to the Washington Office of the Commissioner (WOIC) Fingerprint Requirements page
      Applicants concerned with having a criminal background history can visit Washington Criminal Offenses page for more information
    5. Submit application through the WOIC Online Services
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued through WOIC Online Services

    See complete licensing details, including non-resident information, on the WOIC website.

  • How do I get a West Virginia Adjuster License?

    To obtain your West Virginia Adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic West Virginia Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be trustworthy and competent
    2. While West Virginia does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s West Virginia Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the West Virginia State Exam
      1. Register online with PearsonVue
    4. Submit the application using West Virginia Offices of the Insurance Commissioner (WVOIC) Application for Adjuster’s License
    5. Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the WVOIC website.

  • How do I get a Vermont Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Vermont Adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Vermont Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be competent, trustworthy, financially responsible, and of good personal and business reputation
      3. Meet the experience requirement through one of the following:
        1. The applicant has two years’ experience in handling of loss claims.
        2. The applicant has undergone special training of sufficient duration and scope to make him/her competent to fulfill the license requirements. A person seeking to have special training recognized should submit a detailed description of the training, including syllabi, curriculum and training material.
        3. The applicant is employed by and subject to the immediate personal supervision of a licensed adjuster who is licensed in Vermont and who has been licensed for at least three years.
    2. While Vermont does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Vermont Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Vermont State Exam
      1. Register online with Prometric Vermont
    4. Submit the application through NIPR or Sircon

    See complete licensing details, including non-resident information, on the VDFR website.

    Vermont allows you to hold both an adjuster license and an auto appraiser license in order to handle both parts of an auto claim: the appraisal and the settlement. Click on the auto appraiser tab above to see information on that license.

  • How do I get a Utah Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Utah adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Utah Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be competent and trustworthy
      3. Not have any felony convictions or misdemeanors involving any fiduciary breach of trust, forgery, or theft
    2. While Utah does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Utah Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Utah State Exam
      1. Register online with Prometric
    4. Process and submit Fingerprints according to Utah Insurance Department (UID) Fingerprinting Procedures
    5. Submit the application through NIPR or Sircon
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at NIPR or Sircon

    See complete licensing details, including non-resident information, on the UID website.

  • How do I get a Texas Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Texas adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Texas Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years or older
      2. Be a United States citizen or legal alien who possesses a work authorization from the US Immigration and Naturalization Services
    2. Complete the required Texas Pre-licensing Course with state exam through AdjusterPro for the requested line of authority:
      • Texas All Lines Adjuster Pre-licensing
      • Texas Property & Casualty Adjuster Pre-licensing
    3. Process and submit Fingerprints according to the instructions on the Texas Department of Insurance (TDI) Fingerprint Requirements page
    4. Submit the application through Sircon
    5. Check to see if your license has been issued at TDI License Search

    See complete licensing details, including non-resident information, on the TDI Licensing Resources page and TDI Licensing FAQ.

     

  • How do I get a South Carolina Adjuster License?

    To obtain your South Carolina adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic South Carolina Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
    2. While South Carolina does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s South Carolina Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the South Carolina State Exam
      1. Register online with PSI
    4. Provide an original SLED Report from South Carolina Law Enforcement Division
    5. Submit the application through NIPR
    6. Your National Producer Number (NPN) will be used as your South Carolina license number. You can find your National Producer Number at https://nipr.com/PacNpnSearch.htm

    See complete licensing details, including non-resident information, on the SCDOI website.

    South Carolina requires you to hold both an adjuster license and an auto appraiser license to handle auto claims. Click on the auto appraiser tab above for more information.

  • How do I get a Rhode Island Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Rhode Island adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Rhode Island Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
    2. While Rhode Island does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Rhode Island Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Rhode Island State Exam
      1. Register online with PearsonVue
    4. Obtain a Criminal Background Report from the Rhode Island Attorney General’s office by calling the office at 401-274-4400
    5. Submit the application through NIPR
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the Rhode Island Department of Business Regulation website.

    Rhode Island allows you to hold both an adjuster license and an auto appraiser license in order to handle both parts of an auto claim: the appraisal and the settlement. Click on the Auto Appraiser tab above for more information.

  • How do I get an Oregon Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Oregon adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Oregon Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
    2. While Oregon does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Oregon Exam Prep course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Oregon State Exam
      1. Register online with PSI
    4. Process and submit Fingerprints according to Oregon PSI Fingerprint Instructions
    5. Submit the application through NIPR Oregon
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS Oregon

    See additional licensing details, including non-resident information, on the Oregon Division of Financial Regulation Licensing Instructions page.

  • How do I get a North Carolina Adjuster License?

    To obtain your North Carolina adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic North Carolina Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
    2. While North Carolina does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s North Carolina Adjuster Exam Prep course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Submit the application online through NIPR before scheduling the state exam
      1. Once you have applied, you will receive an email authorization from PearsonVUE that contains information on how to schedule your exam
    4. Register for and pass the North Carolina State Exam
      1. Register with PearsonVue once you receive authorization
      2. 48-72 hours after you pass the exam, NIPR will match your test results with your pending license application and send you an email with further instructions
    5. Check if your license has been issued at SBS

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information, on the North Carolina Department of Insurance (NCDOI) website and the NCDOI FAQ page.

  • How do I get a New York Adjuster License?

    To obtain your New York adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic New York Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be trustworthy and competent
      3. Never have committed a felony or any crime involving fraudulent or dishonest practices
    2. While New York does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s New York Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the New York State Exam
      1. Register online with PSI
        when asked to select pre-licensing provider from the drop down menu, select 7777 Pre-Licensing Waived (because pre-licensing is not required for this license)
    4. Submit an application using the New York Department of Financial Services (NYDFS) Instructions for IA (Independent Adjuster) Applicant. After passing the exam, we recommend waiting a week to submit your application in order for your exam to be processed
    5. Additionally, you will need to do the following: (Detailed information on these items are covered on the application)
      1. Get your Fingerprints processed through IdentoGo
      2. Submit five Certificates of Character
      3. Provide a $1,000 bond to cover the licensing period
      4. Include a Certificate of Good Conduct from the Board of Parole if you have committed a felony or crime involving fraudulent or dishonest practices
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at NYDFS License Search

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the NYDFS website.

    New York allows you to hold both an adjuster license and an auto appraiser license in order to handle both parts of an auto claim: the appraisal and the settlement. Click on the Auto Appraiser tab at the top of the page for more information.

  • How do I get a New Mexico Adjuster License?

    To obtain your New Mexico adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1.  Meet the basic New Mexico Adjuster Licensing Requirements
    a.  Be at least 18 years old
    b.  Be able to demonstrate a good business reputation, and must intend to engage in a bona fide manner in the business of adjusting insurance claims
    c.  Have at least one year’s experience or special education or training in handling claims under insurance contracts. Such experience, education, and training must be of such nature and extent as to demonstrate applicant’s competence to fulfill the responsibilities of an adjuster

    2.  While New Mexico does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s New Mexico Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam

    3.  Register for and pass the New Mexico State Exam
    – Register online with Prometric New Mexico

    4.  Process and submit Fingerprints through 3M Cogent and attach the Proof of Fingerprinting Submissions Receipt to your application

    5.  Complete the Independent Adjuster Affiliation Form

    6.  Post Independent Adjuster Surety Bond with a coverage of $10,000

    7.  Submit an application through NIPR within 30 days of passing the exam

    8.  Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the New Mexico Office of Superintendent of Insurance website

  • How do I get a New Hampshire Adjuster License?

    To obtain your New Hampshire adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1.  Meet the basic New Hampshire Adjuster Licensing Requirements
    – Be at least 18 years old

    2.  While New Hampshire does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s New Hampshire Adjuster Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam

    3.  Register for and pass the New Hampshire State Exam
    – Register online with Prometric New Hampshire

    4.  Submit the application using New Hampshire Insurance Department (NHID) Adjuster License Application or online at NIPR

    5.  Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS

    See complete licensing details, including information for nonresidents, on the NHID Adjuster Licensing page

  • How do I get a Nevada Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Nevada adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1.  Meet the basic Nevada Adjuster Licensing Requirements
    – Be at least 18 years old
    – Be able to declare Nevada as your home state
    – Be an independent contractor
    – Be competent, trustworthy, financially responsible and of good reputation
    – Never have convicted of forgery, embezzlement, obtaining money under false pretenses, larceny, extortion, or conspiracy to commit fraud

    2.  Take a state-approved pre-licensing course. AdjusterPro does not currently offer a pre-licensing class for Nevada adjusters. You can search for available courses through Sircon.

    3.  Register for and pass the Nevada State Exam
    – Register online with PearsonVue Nevada

    4.  Process and submit Fingerprints according to Nevada Division of Insurance (NDOI) Requirements

    5.  Submit the application through NIPR or Sircon

    Nevada does not license nonresidents as independent adjusters. Nonresidents wishing to adjust in Nevada must be affiliated with a Nevada resident Independent Adjuster and apply for an ‘Associate Adjuster’ license through Sircon

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information, on the NDOI website

  • How do I get a Montana Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Montana adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1.  Meet the basic Montana Adjuster Licensing Requirements
    a.  Be at least 18 years old
    b.  Be trustworthy and of good character and reputation
    c.  Maintain an office accessible to the public in Montana with records of transactions made under the license

    2.  While Montana does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Montana Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam

    3.  Register for and pass the Montana State Exam
    – Register online with PearsonVue

    4.  Get fingerprinted through IdentiGo

    5.  Submit an application through NIPR

    6.  Check to see if your license has been issued at NIPR

    See complete adjuster licensing details, including nonresident information, on the Montana Commissioner of Securities and Insurance website.

  • How do I get a Mississippi Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Mississippi adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1.  Meet the basic Mississippi Adjuster Licensing Requirements
    – Be at least 18 years old

    2.  Complete the required 20-hour Mississippi Pre-licensing Course through AdjusterPro

    3.  Register for and pass the Mississippi State Exam
    Register online with PearsonVue

    When registering for your state exam, have a copy of your certificate of completion from class handy. Your certificate of completion is available in the Certificates folder in your online classroom. Bring your certificate of completion to the test center with you when you go. Our provider information is as follows:

    Provider Name: Versicat ITU, LLC, Pre-Licensing Provider Number: 15019046; Pre-Licensing Course Number: 17960

    4.  Submit the application through NIPR or Sircon

    5.  Check to see if your license has been issued at Mississippi Insurance Department (MID) Licensing Search

    See complete adjuster licensing details, including nonresident information, on the MID website.

  • How do I get a Minnesota Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Minnesota adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1.  Meet the basic Minnesota Adjuster Licensing Requirements
    a.  Be at least 18 years old
    b.  Be competent and trustworthy
    c.  Not be involved in any activity that would cause license removal or suspension for three years prior to application

    2.  Prepare to pass the state exam with AdjusterPro’s Minnesota Exam Prep course

    3.  Register for and pass the Minnesota State Exam
    Register online with PearsonVue

    4.  Process and submit Fingerprints according to the Minnesota Commerce Department (MCD) Fingerprinting FAQ page

    5.  Submit application through Sircon

    6.  Check to see if your license has been issued at NIPR

    See complete adjuster licensing details, including non-resident information, on the MCD Licensing Education page.

  • How do I get a Michigan Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Michigan adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1.  Meet the basic Michigan Adjuster Licensing Requirements
    a.  Be at least 18 years old

    b.  Prepare to pass the state exam with our Michigan Adjuster Exam Prep course

    c.  Register for and pass the Michigan State Exam
    – Register online with PSI

    d.  Submit application through NIPR

    See additional licensing details, including nonresident information, on the Michigan Department of Insurance and Financial Services (DIFS) website.

  • How do I get a Maine Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Maine adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Maine Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
    2. Prepare for the state exam. We recommend taking our Maine exam prep course. It’s 100% online and will prepare you to pass the state adjuster exam.
    3. Register for and pass the Maine Adjuster State Exam
      1. Register online with PearsonVue
    4. Submit an application through NIPR
    5. Check to see if your license has been issued at NIPR

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the Maine Professional and Financial Regulation website.

  • How do I get a Louisiana Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Louisiana adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Louisiana Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be competent and trustworthy
      3. Maintain an office accessible to the public
    2. While Louisiana does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Louisiana Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Louisiana State Exam
      1. Register online with PSI
    4. Submit application through NIPR
    5. Process and submit Fingerprints according to Louisiana Department of Insurance (LDI) Fingerprints Requirements
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at LDI Search

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the LDI website.

  • How do I get a Kentucky Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Kentucky adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Kentucky Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be trustworthy and of good reputation
      3. Be financially responsible
      4. Be competent to exercise the license
      5. Have an office accessible to the public
    2. While Kentucky does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Kentucky Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Submit application through Kentucky Department of Insurance (KYDOI)
    4. Register for and pass the Kentucky State Exam
      1. Detailed testing information is available at KYDOI Testing Site/Schedules
      2. You must submit an application before creating an account or scheduling an exam
    5. After passing the state exam, process and submit a Criminal Background Check
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued by logging into the Kentucky Online Gateway

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information at KYDOI Information Page.

  • How do I get an Indiana Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Indiana adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Indiana Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be determined to be trustworthy, reliable, and of good reputation
      3. Not have committed any act that is a ground for denial, suspension or revocation of a license
    2. Complete the required Indiana Adjuster Pre-licensing Course with state exam through AdjusterPro (please allow 2-3 business days to submit your scores to the Indiana Department of Insurance)
      If you took the Indiana Pre-licensing Course from another vendor, you will need to provide a completion certificate from an approved provider as a prerequisite before being allowed to take the state exam.
    3. Submit application through Sircon
    4. Check to see if your license has been issued at Sircon

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information at Indiana Department of Insurance (IDOI) website.

  • How do I get an Idaho Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Idaho adjusters license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Idaho Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 21 years old
      2. Be trustworthy, with good character, reputation, morals, integrity, and financial responsibility
      3. Not have been convicted or pled guilty to a felony or a misdemeanor involving moral depravity
    2. While Idaho does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Idaho Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Idaho State Exam
      1. Register online with PSI
    4. Submit CHRI Request and Release Form
    5. Process and submit Fingerprints according to PSI Fingerprinting Instructions
    6. Submit application through NIPR or Sircon
    7. Check to see if your license has been issued at Idaho Department of Insurance (IDOI) Professional Licensing Search

    See complete adjuster licensing details, including nonresident information on the IDOI Website.

  • How do I get a Hawaii Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Hawaii adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Hawaii Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. If previously convicted of any felony, applicant must request the commissioner’s written consent to engage in the business of insurance
    2. Prepare for the state exam with AdjusterPro’s Hawaii Exam Prep course
    3. Register for and pass the Hawaii State Exam
      1. Register online with PearsonVue
    4. Process and submit Fingerprints through Fieldprint
    5. Submit application through Hawaii Department of Commerce and Consumer Affairs (HDCCA)
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at HDCCA License Search

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the HDCCA website.

  • How do I get a Georgia Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Georgia adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Georgia adjuster licensing requirements
      • Be at least 18 years old
      • Have not committed any serious RIRS actions or 1033 actions
      • Able to provide employment history for the past five (5) years with no gaps to the current date. This includes full and part-time work, self-employment, military service, unemployment, and/or full-time education.
      • Provide a valid mailing address in the state of Georgia. P.O Boxes are not allowed.
      • Applicants who are non-citizen must provide proof of eligibility to work in the U.S. to the state of Georgia.
    2. Complete the required Georgia Property & Casualty Adjuster Pre-licensing Course through AdjusterPro
    3. Register for and pass the Georgia State Exam
      • Register online with PearsonVUE
        When registering for your state exam, have a copy of your certificate of completion from class handy, and bring it to the testing center when you go to take your exam.
        Your certificate of completion will be available in your online classroom when your course is complete.
        Our provider information is as follows:  
        Provider Name: Versicat ITU, LLC dba AdjusterPro; Pre-Licensing Provider Number: 155881; 20-Hour Property Pre-licensing 38369, 20-Hour Casualty Pre-licensing 38368
    4. Process and submit Fingerprints according to the instructions at the Georgia Office of Insurance and Fire Safety Commission Licensing Background Check Fingerprint Procedure
    5. Submit application through Sircon
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at Georgia Office of Insurance Search

    See complete licensing details, including non-resident information, on the Georgia Office of Insurance website.

  • How do I get a Florida Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Florida adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Florida Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be a natural person at least 18 years of age
      2. Be a resident of the State of Florida
      3. Be a United States citizen or legal alien who possesses a work authorization from the United States Immigration and Naturalization Services
    2. Complete the required Florida Certified Designation Course with state exam through AdjusterPro
    3. Process and submit Fingerprints according to instructions at Florida Department of Financial Services (FLDFS) Fingerprinting Requirements
    4. Submit application through MyProfile
    5. If required, submit Proof of Citizenship Documentation 
    6. Applicants concerned with criminal background questions on the application can view a list of Disqualifying Crimes provided by the state
    7. Check to see if your license has been issued by logging into MyProfile

    In Florida, all insurance licenses require an appointment. Independent adjusters self-appoint. Complete the following steps to do that:

    • Go to MyProfile and log in to your account.
    • Select the “Access eAppoint” button under “Apply”. If you have never used eAppoint, you must first register and will need to select “Register to become an appointing entity”.
    • Once in the eAppoint Workbench, select the required tab (New Appointment, Renew Appointment, or Terminate Appointment) and follow the instructions on the page. You will need to pay the $60 fee. Appointments must be renewed every 24 months during the appointee’s birth month.

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information at FLDFS Licensing Information.

  • How do I get a Delaware Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Delaware adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Delaware Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
    2. While Delaware does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing an AdjusterPro Delaware Exam Prep Course for your preferred line of authority to ensure passing the state exam.
      • Property
      • Casualty
      • Motor Vehicle Adjuster
    3. Register for and pass the Delaware State Exam
    4. Submit application through NIPR
    5. Submit a Delaware State Criminal History Check and a FBI Criminal History Check. Both reports should be faxed to 302-736-7906 within 90 days of obtaining fingerprints and submitting your application
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS Delaware

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the Delaware Department of Insurance (DDOI) website and the DDOI Licensing FAQ page.

    Delaware allows you to hold both an adjuster license and an auto appraiser license in order to handle both parts of an auto claim: the appraisal and the settlement. Click on the Appraiser Compliance tab above for more information.

  • How do I get a Connecticut Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Connecticut adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Connecticut Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be of good moral character
    2. While Connecticut does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Connecticut Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Connecticut State Exam
      1. Register online with Prometric Connecticut
    4. Submit application through Connecticut Insurance Department (CID) or NIPR
    5. Check to see if your license has been issued at CID Verify and Print License

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the CID website.

    Connecticut allows you to hold both an adjuster license and an auto appraiser license in order to handle both parts of an auto claim: the appraisal and the settlement. Click on the Appraiser Compliance tab above for more information.

  • How do I get a California Adjuster License?

    To obtain your California adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic California Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Have two years certified experience in the insurance adjusting field, equal to 4,000 compensated hours
    2. While California does not require a pre-licensing course, we highly recommend completing AdjusterPro’s California Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Process and submit Fingerprints through Accurate Biometrics or your PSI Testing Center
      California recommends applicants complete fingerprinting prior to taking the exam. This will help ensure your license is not held up due to processing. Fingerprints can be scheduled two different ways:
      See complete fingerprinting details on the California Department of Insurance (CDI) Fingerprinting Requirements page
    4. Register for and pass the California State Exam
      1. Register online with PSI
    5. Obtain and submit a $2,000 Bond of Insurance adjuster using form CDI Form 31A-14
    6. Submit application using Sircon or LIC 041-A
    7. Check to see if your license has been issued at CDI License Search

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the CDI Licensing Guide website.

  • How do I get an Arkansas Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Arkansas adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Arkansas Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years of old
      2. Be competent, trustworthy, financially responsible, and of good reputation
      3. Maintain an office accessible to the public
    2. Complete the Arkansas Adjuster Pre-licensing Course with exam through AdjusterPro
      If you completed test prep with another vendor, you will need to take the state exam with PSI
    3. Submit application through NIPR
    4. Email your Certificate of Completion and your NIPR transaction number to peggy.dunlap@arkansas.gov
    5. Complete the Arkansas State Police Form located at end of the NIPR online application for Arkansas
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS Arkansas

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the Arkansas Insurance Department website.

  • How do I get an Arizona Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Arizona adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Arizona Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
    2. While Arizona does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Arizona Adjuster Exam Prep Course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Arizona State Exam
      1. Register online with Prometric Arizona
    4. Submit application through NIPR
    5. Process and submit Fingerprints according to Arizona Department of Insurance and Financial Institutions Individual License Application Instructions under the bullet point ‘Provide Your Fingerprints’

    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the ADI website.

  • How do I get an Alaska Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Alaska adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Alaska Adjuster Licensing Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be trustworthy and competent
      3. Have at least 6 months experience, within the past two years, in any of the following:
        • Independent Adjuster
        • Independent Adjuster Trainee
        • Insurance Producer
        • Managing General Agent
        • Reinsurance Intermediary Manager or Broker
        • Underwriter or Claims Adjuster employee of an insurer
    2. Prepare for the state exam with AdjusterPro’s Alaska Adjuster Exam Prep course
    3. Register for and pass the Alaska State Exam
      1. Register online with PearsonVue Alaska
    4. Process and submit Fingerprints through PearsonVue Background Check
    5. Submit application through NIPR
    6. Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS Alaska

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the State of Alaska Department of Commerce website.

  • How do I get an Alabama Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Alabama adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Alabama Adjuster License Requirements
        1. Be at least 18 years old
        2. Be a bona fide resident of Alabama
      1. Complete the required Alabama Adjuster Pre-licensing Course with state exam through AdjusterPro for the requested line of authority.
            • Alabama Property & Casualty, Workers’ Compensation, and Crop – 40 hours
            • Alabama Property & Casualty – 20 hours
            • Alabama Workers’ Compensation – 20 hours
            • Alabama Crop – 20 hours
      1. Process and submit Fingerprints through Gemalto
      2. Submit Proof of Citizenship Documentation
      3. Three to five days after receiving your course Certificate of Completion, submit application through NIPR
      4. Check to see if your license has been issued at SBS Alabama

    See complete licensing details, including nonresident information on the Alabama Department of Insurance (ADOI) website.

  • How do I get an Oklahoma Adjuster License?

    To obtain your Oklahoma adjuster license, complete the following steps:

    1. Meet the basic Oklahoma License Requirements
      1. Be at least 18 years old
      2. Be a bona fide resident of Oklahoma
    2. While Oklahoma does not require a pre-licensing course, we recommend completing AdjusterPro’s Oklahoma Adjuster Exam Prep course to ensure passing the state exam
    3. Register for and pass the Oklahoma State Exam
      – Register online with Prometric Oklahoma
    4. Submit the application through NIPR
    5. Check to see if your license has been issued at Oklahoma Insurance Department (OKID) Licensee Look-Up

    See Complete Licensing details, including non-resident information, on the OKID website.

  • Can I take the same CE courses in back-to-back compliance cycles?

    The answer to this question depends on which state you are taking CE for, as the rule varies by state:

    • Alabama: Can I take the same CE course 2 years in a row and receive credit? No. You cannot receive credit for any course more than once in any reporting period. 
    • Florida: Can I take the same CE course next year? No. You cannot repeat the same course within 3 years and receive CE credit. 
    • Indiana: Can I take the same CE course 2 years in a row and receive credit? No. You cannot receive credit for any course more than once in any CE reporting period. 
    • Oklahoma: Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include:
      • 3 hours of Ethics
      • 2-hour OK Law Update
      • 1-hour Earthquake course (for property adjusters only)
      • You cannot repeat a course within a 24-month period.
    • Texas: You will only receive credit once if the same course is taken multiple times during a 2-year license term.
  • Is the insurance adjuster market already saturated?

    The spike in insurance claims after a major storm means that it will be very hard to fill every spot needed to meet the demand. Remember, insurers are on a strict time table when it comes to claims. They still have to contact, inspect, settle, and pay claims within a certain time period or face financial penalties and potential public relations issues if they can’t meet their policy obligations.

    And when a mass of adjusters are deployed to an area to handle disaster claims, they leave open jobs all over the country where daily claims or smaller storm claims still need to be handled. Hurricane Harvey was a good example of this. As thousands and thousands of adjusters were deployed to Texas and Louisiana, there were far too few adjusters left to handle claims elsewhere. Our IA firm partners were reaching out to us not for help with Harvey, but because they had no adjusters left to handle claims in places like New York, Oklahoma, and Michigan.

    And while there is a large number of licensed adjusters out there, but many do not use their license all year, some only work certain areas or claims, and some never use it at all. And every year adjuster licenses aren’t renewed for a number of reasons. It’s also important to note that the insurance industry is losing employees from every department at record numbers as baby boomers, who make up most of the industry, are retiring.

  • Will companies hire adjusters without experience?

    In almost any scenario, most companies prefer someone with job experience over someone brand new, but that doesn’t mean you can’t get hired. But you do need to put in the work. Get licensed. Learn Xactimate. Apply to rosters and take advantage of the trainings offered by IA Firms.

    The hardest part about getting started as an independent adjuster is usually getting training with a firm and landing that first deployment. During a large catastrophe, the demand is so great they often have to immediately pull a large number of adjusters in to meet it and that often includes new or inexperienced adjusters. During these spurts, companies will also typically ramp up their training, making it easier for you to meet managers, get training, and be assigned claims. The immediate need for adjusters plus increased training opportunities, combined with the massive numbers of disaster claims usually result in storms offering new adjusters a peak chance to break into the field.

    It’s important to note that right now, the insurance industry is losing thousands of employees in all sectors to retirement. So while catastrophes are well known for offering new folks great opportunities to get hired, it is by no means your only chance.

  • What will help me learn how to do the actual job of an adjuster?

    It can be challenging for new insurance adjusters to learn the actual job duties until they’re ON the job. But there are a few things you can do to set yourself up for success.

    • We recently partnered with veteran adjusters John O’Brien and Peter Gaetano to launch a one-of-a-kind new training course: The Adjuster Success Method. The course goes beyond licensing and policy to address how to get hired and what tools you’ll need to do the job. Then Peter and John will walk you through everything you need to know about successfully closing claims. From the starting point of being handed your first claim to getting paid and understanding when a claim is truly closed, the course will walk you through every step. The ASM course teaches a system that will not only help you close your first claims, but establish the foundation for a long-lived, successful career. If you want to read more about the course, read John’s Adjuster Success Method blog article.

     

    • Learning Xactimate is something you see us recommend again and again for new adjusters. AdjusterPro Co-Founder Adam Gardiner wrote a great blog article about his first deployment experience that explains why it’s vital to get a handle on the software before you go into the field. Good Xactimate training, like AdjusterPro’s, not only helps you learn the program itself, but it walks you through how to scope a claim. Then you can take your knowledge and practice on your own home, your friends’ and neighbors’, so you are ready to work fast during a CAT deployment.

     

    • Getting your home state or designated home state license is always the first step to becoming an adjuster. During a catastrophe, the demand for adjusters skyrockets so employers often have to pull in large numbers to meet it. That means they will also typically ramp up their training, making it easier and more accessible to get trained. But the only way you will be notified or invited to these trainings is to be on their rosters…and you can only be on their roster if you hold a license.

     

     

  • How do I make sure I’m prepared to work catastrophe claims?

    After a large scale catastrophe, insurance adjusters are often hired en masse and quickly deployed to the affected area. Being ready to go before the storm hits can make all the difference in whether or not you get hired. Our Co-Founder, Dan Kerr, wrote a great blog article called ‘Ready for the Storm: What Every New Adjuster Needs to Know‘ that explains the steps you need to put yourself in the best position to find work after a disaster.

  • How do I become a claims adjuster?

    In most states, you need to be licensed to adjust claims. The process, steps, and fees vary a bit by state but generally follow the same pattern. Get your home state, or Designated Home State (DHS) license if you live in a nonlicensing state. You need to take and pass your state adjuster exam, and submit a license application.

    To see detailed instructions for your specific state, visit Adjuster Licensing

  • How much money does an insurance adjuster make?

    The amount of money an adjuster makes is largely dependent on how efficient they are at their job. Independent adjusters are paid on a ‘fee schedule’ where they receive a percentage of each of the claims closed. The percentage offered can vary based on a few factors: how often they work, the employer, the adjuster’s experience level, and the demand for adjusters at any given time.

    Large scale disasters, like hurricanes Harvey and Irma, can create competition for adjusters so IA firms will alter their pay percentages to try and attract the best workforce. During these periods, experienced adjusters can make $100,000 in just a few months. But remember, you are an independent contractor and these periods are not predictable or reliable. You need to know how to manage the boons and droughts to remain successful long term. The current average salary for an adjuster is roughly $63,000 but again, that varies. The top 10% of earners make closer to $100,000 annually, even in down years. Adjusters who won’t travel, get too picky with assignments, or only work a few months a year earn closer to $40,000.

  • What is an insurance claims adjuster?

    A claims adjuster is a representative of the insurance company. After a policyholder submits a claim, the adjuster comes in to investigate the loss. The loss can be anything from a major home flood or fire to a small window break or fender bender. They inspect homes, conduct interviews, consult records, or perform any number of duties to gather the details surrounding the reported event. The adjuster then interprets the customer’s insurance policy and determines what is covered. In many cases, adjusters negotiate the settlement on behalf of the insurance carrier and may authorize payments to the policyholder.

  • Who becomes an insurance adjuster?

    Nearly anyone can become an insurance adjuster. A college degree is not typically required for independent adjusters but most states require a person to be at least 18 years old. While some adjusters start out in the insurance industry, many folks begin their claims career after work in other fields. Common backgrounds include property construction, inspection, or appraisal, or insurance and real estate sales. These backgrounds lend themselves well to the work of handling claims. However, teachers, farmers, attorneys, plumbers, truck drivers, and a host of other professionals have all made successful transitions into the world of insurance claims adjusting.

  • Why are insurance adjusters needed?

    Insurance adjusters are needed because settling most types of insurance claims requires human judgment. Every claim is unique in its own way. While we have seen technology change the claims industry – call centers, computers, AI, and bots can’t interpret the subtleties of every home, car, flood, fire, burglary, storm, etc. the way a claims adjuster can. Field adjusters are required to use their senses, intelligence, training, and experience to interpret the insurance claims so both the customer and the insurance carrier receive a fair outcome.

  • Will claims adjusters still be needed in the future?

    Yes! Much of the new technology has been aimed at streamlining the process, both for customers and adjusters, rather than fully eliminating the personal touch. And the need for adjusters is never higher than after a large scale catastrophe strikes. In 2005 after hurricanes Katrina, Wilma, and Rita, insurance companies were desperate for licensed adjusters. And we have seen a similar situation recently after hurricanes Harvey, Irma, Maria, and Nate. Claims adjusters are some of the first people let into a disaster zone, and in fact, adjusters are often deployed before catastrophe even strikes as in the case of Harvey and Irma. Large scale events also create a domino effect around the country. When so many adjusters get deployed to a catastrophe, it leaves holes in areas all over the US that still need adjusters for daily claims or smaller scale storms and events.

  • Where do insurance adjusters work?

    There are two basic employment options for adjusters: staff adjuster or independent adjuster. Staff adjusters work directly for the insurance carrier and independent adjusters work for Independent Adjusting Firms. IA Firms are relatively new in the insurance industry but now play a vital role in claims. Insurance companies know that there will be spikes and dips in claim volume from year to year, and they set policy premiums accordingly. For example, a large insurance company might expect 30,000 claims to be filed in Galveston, Texas during a normal year, but they realize that number could spike to 130,000 if a hurricane hits.

    Claims fluctuate throughout a normal year too and these fluctuations present a staffing challenge for insurers. If they keep enough adjusters on the payroll to handle any contingency, they’d be overstaffed 90% of the time, decreasing their profitability. On the other hand, if they keep only a skeleton crew, the delay caused by trying to staff after a large spike would be disastrous for insurance companies. There are strict laws, steep fines, and public relations problems if claims are not handled on time, and it is difficult to hire qualified adjusters on short notice. Enter the Independent Adjusting Firm. Carriers now outsource claims to these firms and in turn, the firms can keep many more adjusters employed regularly.

  • What is the difference between an independent adjuster and a staff adjuster?

    Independent Adjusters generally work for Independent Adjusting Firms. They go wherever they are needed on a contracted basis. You may get ‘deployed’ for a month to a disaster zone, then have that contract re-upped multiple times and end up staying for 8 months. Where an independent adjuster lives really has no bearing on where he works – which can be a great benefit as you can live where you want rather than where the jobs are. An adjuster may live in Iowa, contract with an Independent Adjusting Firm in Texas, and get deployed to Florida to work claims. As contractors, independent adjusters work for themselves and can take deployments when and where they want. But the most successful adjusters gain the trust of their IA Firm employers by being willing to go when and where they are needed most at any given time.

    Staff Adjusters are salaried employees of the insurance carrier. While they may still travel, it is usually much less frequent and only within a specific region. Staff adjusters have steady, reliable work from their carrier which is great for those who may need to stay close to home. But there is an exchange for this benefit as compensation is usually lower than what independent adjusters receive.

  • Where can I find career advice after getting licensed?

    We have a host of different articles in The AdjusterPro Blog that discuss what you need to do to find work, the ways to go about it, and the characteristics that will help you stand out to employers. After obtaining your license, we recommend getting on as many IA Firm rosters as possible, and diligently following up with employers in a professional manner.

    Adding additional licenses so you can work in multiple states is a big bonus, as is Xactimate certification. Make sure your resume highlights any related experience, especially if you’ve worked in the construction/restoration field, held a different job in the insurance industry, or have customer service experience in difficult situations.

  • What is the difference between All-lines and P&C adjusters?

    The basic difference lies in which types of insurance you have the authority to handle claims for. The all-lines adjuster license includes property and casualty (P&C) for residential, commercial, automobile, farm & ranch, inland marine, ocean marine, as well as workers’ comp insurance. The P&C license covers all of the above, with the exception of workers’ comp. So to put it plainly, all-lines includes workers’ comp and P&C does not.

    For those who want a more detailed look, let’s review each type of insurance:

    Residential – property used primarily for dwelling
    Commercial – property used for business, recreation, worship, etc (not for dwelling)
    Auto – cars, motorcycles, and covered vehicles used for non-commercial transport
    Farm & Ranch – dwelling, outbuildings, barns, animals, equipment, crops in storage (crops in the field typically require separate crop insurance)
    Inland Marine – commercial trucks in transit and their cargo; docks, piers, bridges
    Ocean Marine – sea vessels and their cargo (the first type of insurance as we know it today)
    Workers’ Comp – employees injured while on the job

    So which license do you need? We recommend the All-Lines adjuster license because it certifies you to handle more lines of insurance and represents the most comprehensive license available. And while you may only handle residential or auto, you won’t be restricted to doing so because of your license.

  • Which state offers the best reciprocity?

    This is one of the most common misconceptions about reciprocity. Too often, adjusters believe or hear from someone else that some states enjoy more reciprocity than others (e.g. Texas is reciprocal with 32 states!). That may have been true once upon a time, but in today’s industry, reciprocity is predicated not on what state license you have but on whether it’s your home state license. So if you want to enjoy reciprocal licensing privileges, you need to hold your home state license first. It’s that simple.

  • How do I get reciprocal licenses?

    Just because your home state is reciprocal with another does not mean you can just hop across state lines and begin working claims. You need to apply for the reciprocal license and pay the state’s fees. Obtaining reciprocal licenses will cost you anywhere from $55 – $175 per state for the application fees, plus the time it takes to complete all the necessary paperwork; usually about a day or two. Most states’ applications can be completed and submitted online from either NIPR or Sircon.

  • How does getting reciprocal licenses help me?

    The bottom line: the more licenses you have, the better. Whether it’s an insurance carrier or an independent adjusting firm, employers need adjusters who can work whenever and wherever claims happen. And you can only do that if you have the proper license for that state.

    For example, employers may need to send hundreds of adjusters to Florida after a hurricane. The company checks their roster and adjusters who hold a Florida license are first in line for deployment. But the large number of adjusters sent to Florida leaves holes for the daily claims that will still need to be handled in states like Georgia and Mississippi. So now they need to find adjusters who are licensed in those states to come in and work. You get the idea….

    Bottom Line: being licensed in multiple states will make you more attractive to employers, increase your revenue, and allow you to help wherever you are needed.

  • How do I maintain my license? What is continuing education (CE)?

    Most states require adjusters to pay a fee and submit some information to renew their license every two years. This can usually be done electronically through NIPR or Sircon, but some states use an internal system of their own.

    Additionally, most states also require adjusters to complete continuing education (CE) hours each renewal period. You can find the renewal information for your state by visiting our ‘Get Started’ page, choosing your state, then scrolling down to ‘CE & License Renewal.’ Details include how many hours are required in your state to renew your license and whether those credits need to contain a certain number of hours in a particular subject, like Ethics or Legislative Updates. 

  • Can I take the same CE courses in back-to-back compliance cycles?

    The answer to this question depends on which state you are taking CE for, as the rule varies by state:

    • Alabama: Can I take the same CE course 2 years in a row and receive credit? No. You cannot receive credit for any course more than once in any reporting period. 
    • Florida: Can I take the same CE course next year? No. You cannot repeat the same course within 3 years and receive CE credit. 
    • Indiana: Can I take the same CE course 2 years in a row and receive credit? No. You cannot receive credit for any course more than once in any CE reporting period. 
    • Oklahoma: Resident adjusters are required to complete 24 hours of continuing education (CE) every two years. The 24 hours must include:
      • 3 hours of Ethics
      • 2-hour OK Law Update
      • 1-hour Earthquake course (for property adjusters only)
      • You cannot repeat a course within a 24-month period.
    • Texas: You will only receive credit once if the same course is taken multiple times during a 2-year license term.
  • How are my CE credits submitted to the state?

    AdjusterPro will submit your continuing education (CE) to the appropriate state for you.  Make sure you have entered your license number in the account profile in your online classroom. To do this, click on the arrow at the top right-hand corner of your screen (to the right of the circle that has your initials in it).  Click on Profile and scroll down to Extended Profile. Enter your license number in question 3, and complete 4 and 5 if they apply to you.

    If you have any questions about this, contact us at support@adjusterpro.com or by phone at 214.329.9030 x2.

  • Do I need a license to be a claims adjuster?

    Yes! While there are 16 states that still do not license claims adjusters, the majority of states do. Employers, either insurance carriers or Independent Adjusting Firms, need adjusters who can work a multitude of claims in a variety of areas. You will give yourself the best chance for employment by obtaining your home state, or ‘designated home state’ license, and then getting reciprocal licenses so you can work in other states as well.

  • What license do I need? Is there a nationwide license?

    While the industry is trying to create more uniform licensing standards, there is no ‘national claims adjuster’ license. The first step in becoming a claims adjuster is to get licensed in your home state. To see details and instructions for your specific state, choose ‘Products’ then ‘Adjuster Licensing’ from the navigation menu above, then scroll down to view the compliance and application information for your state. 

  • What if my home state doesn’t license? What is a DHS license?

    If you live in a non-licensing state, you should obtain a “Designated Home State” or DHS license. A DHS license basically works just like having your home state license and is vital if you want to work any claims outside of your non-licensing state. If you live in Kansas for example, you can adjust claims there without a license, but you can’t go work claims in Florida or Texas. While a host of different states offer a DHS license, we recommend obtaining the Florida 70-20 Nonresident DHS license. It offers great reciprocity and Florida has the quickest application turnaround time in the country.

    States that do not currently license adjusters: Colorado, District of Columbia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

  • What is reciprocity?

    Reciprocity, or reciprocal licensing privileges, allows a licensed adjuster to obtain another state(s) license without having to pass that specific state’s exam. Thank goodness, right? Once you have your home state or DHS license, you can apply for other state licenses through reciprocity.

    It’s not automatic – you will need to complete the required paperwork and submit the licensing fees but most licensing states are now reciprocal with each other. There are some caveats – New York and California do not reciprocate with any other state for example. To learn what states will offer you a reciprocal license, visit the AdjusterPro Reciprocity Map and click on your state.

  • What reciprocal licenses should I get?

    The bottom line: the more licenses you have, the better. States with frequent catastrophes or weather events like hail and wind are the best places to start. We recommend making sure you have both a Texas and a Florida license, as well as the other Gulf states. Oklahoma, Georgia, and the Carolinas also present a lot of opportunities, as do areas with extreme winter storms like Minnesota.

    If you like a challenge, California and New York are also great licenses to have. The testing and requirements are tougher than most states, but since they do not offer any reciprocity, it doesn’t take much to create an adjuster shortage in those areas after an event.

  • What is an emergency license?

    When a huge amount of adjusters are needed after a big catastrophe, states can declare a state of emergency that will allow them to issue emergency licenses. An emergency adjuster license is temporary, good for 3 to 6 months, and can be extended as needed. These licenses are incredibly important after a disaster as they allow the state to quickly license out-of-state adjusters who otherwise wouldn’t qualify. 

    But they do present a challenge – you must be sponsored by an employer to be approved. And while that doesn’t usually affect veteran adjusters, it can be an obstacle for brand new adjusters who are looking to break into the industry, especially if you don’t already have a working relationship with an insurer, IA firm, or restoration company. It isn’t unheard of for newly licensed rookies to get an emergency license, but given a choice, employers are almost always going to choose a licensed adjuster over a non-licensed one. 

  • What is pre-licensing?

    While most licensing states simply require you to take and pass the exam to get licensed, other states have an additional “pre-licensing requirement.” These states require you to take a certain amount of education hours before you are allowed register to take the state exam. AdjusterPro courses contain approved pre-licensing for all the states where it is required: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Mississippi, Indiana, and Texas.

  • What additional training do you recommend beyond licensing?

    We recommend all new adjusters take our Xactimate live webinar. Being proficient in Xactimate’s estimating software is a vital skill for those just entering the industry. Once you obtain your license, it is also important to get specific carrier certifications like State Farm and Allstate. You won’t be able to work claims for those carriers unless you have their certifications. Most IA Firms offer free classes throughout the year to adjusters on their rosters. Rope access training is important for adjusters wanting to work steep, high, or complex height-related claims. FEMA offers courses for adjusters wanting to become NFIP certified. Ultimately, any additional certification you can obtain regarding fire and flood or water damage will serve you well.

  • Can I get a license if I have a felony or misdemeanor?

    Individual state rules vary regarding issuing an insurance adjuster license to someone who has been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor. 

    Most states do have some sort of regulation stating that licensure “may be denied” if the person has ever been convicted of a felony or misdemeanor. Whether or not the applicant is approved or denied is often based on the type of offense and how long ago it happened, the severity, and whether it was financially motivated or involved fraud/dishonesty — both of which are major red flags in the insurance industry. Misdemeanors are not usually an impediment to getting a license, but again, this isn’t always the case. 

    We recommend checking your state’s Department of Insurance’s website for its particular rules. The details of the crime and when it happened are critical to whether you can be considered for adjuster licensing. Some states, like Oklahoma, require you to complete a waiver and receive approval back from the state before you can apply. If you don’t complete that step, you can be denied a license, regardless of your crime. Other states will want to review copies of court documents to see the specifics of your case.

    If you can’t find the information you need on the website, call the licensing department and discuss the situation with them. They should be able to give you information and directions on how to proceed according to their laws. 

    You can find your Department of Insurance’s contact information in the FAQ section at the bottom of our state adjuster licensing pages

    It is worth noting that while each state has its own rules about issuing licenses to persons with a criminal history, employers (i.e.: insurance carriers and independent adjusting firms) may have completely different hiring policies. So while you may meet the guidelines to get an adjuster license, you will still need to meet a company’s standards for employment to get hired.

    We always recommend applicants be 100% honest about their criminal history on both license and job applications. If you do not report your background and the state or employer finds out later you were convicted of a felony, you will likely lose your license, potentially lose your job, and it could have lasting effects on your future opportunities as well.

  • What is an auto damage appraiser? Do I need that license?

    There are two components to handling an auto claim; appraising the damage to the vehicle and settling the claim itself. Appraisers play a key role in this process, since motor vehicle claims require specialized knowledge of auto repair that most adjusters simply don’t have. That’s where auto damage appraisers come in: these insurance professionals inspect vehicle damage, calculate the worth of the vehicle, and write an estimate for repair. Then the adjuster settles the claim based on the appraisal. Many states require adjusters to hold both licenses if they want to work on both parts of the claim — the appraisal and the settlement. Two states, Connecticut and South Carolina, require adjusters to hold both licenses to work on any part of an auto claim.

  • How long will it take for my license to be issued after I fill out the application?

    Generally speaking, it takes around 2 weeks to receive your license after you submit your application, however the time frame varies by state. Some states, like Indiana and Florida are usually quicker — sometimes taking just days to issue a license. Other states, like Texas, can take up to 6 weeks.

  • Can I submit my application before I am done with your course?

    Whether or not you can submit your adjuster application before completing your pre-licensing course varies from state to state. Some states require you to apply before taking the exam while others specify that you must send your course completion certification in with your application. You can find your state’s specific compliance and application information by going to the Adjuster Licensing page and choosing your state. 

  • Will Xactimate work on any computer?

    Unfortunately, no. Xactimate and other Xactware products are not supported on MacOS Operating Systems. This means if you have a device that uses the MacOS operating system (mainly Apple desktop and Apple laptop computers), the Xactimate software will not be compatible or useable on that computer. Xactimate does work on most other desktops and laptops that use the Windows operating system. We do recommend you take our course on a windows-based computer as that is what our instructor, as well as most employers, will be using to operate Xactimate.

    To see a complete list of accepted device types and operating systems, visit the Xactimate Systems Requirements page.

  • What is Xactimate?

    Xactimate, created by Xactware, is the industry’s most popular claims adjusting software. Adjusters no longer have to write claims by hand, reference pricing books, and use calculators to perform a complete estimate. The Xactimate platform has automated most of those tasks, enabling the adjuster to perform inspections and adjustments much faster.

    The software was designed specifically for construction professionals, restoration specialists, and claims adjusters. Xactimate helps adjusters:

    • Save time and money in creating estimates
    • Create more accurate, detailed, and professional-looking estimates
    • Access the most up-to-date and reliable pricing information
    • Sketch complicated roofs, rooms, layouts, and structures
    • Automate and streamline your estimating processes
    • Organize and manage your projects
    • Overcome language barriers in preparing estimates

    See a complete list of features at Xactimate.com

  • Do I need to know Xactimate?

    We’ve trained tens of thousands of adjusters over the last decade, and it’s become clear that proficiency in Xactimate is the single most important technical skill a new adjuster must acquire. In fact, “are you familiar with Xactimate?” is one of the most frequently asked questions in interviews and on applications. Knowing your way around the software not only sets you ahead of the curve in the employment line, it means you can get to work adjusting claims immediately once you’re deployed. You’ll be able to work through inspections and adjustments faster and with more accuracy, which is truly money in your pocket.

  • What is Xactimate Certification?

    The Xactimate User Certification program, offered solely by Xactware, provides a controlled exam to independently verify your product knowledge and proficiency. There are three levels of certification: Level 1 – Fundamentals, Level 2 – Proficiency, and Level 3 – Mastery. Each level increases in difficulty and is considered a prerequisite for the next level. Details on how to become certified are available on the Xactimate Training Website.

    While official Xactimate Certification is only available through Xactware, the AdjusterPro Course will help prepare you for the Level 1 exam should you choose to pursue certification. It’s also worth noting that most employers want to know whether you have a working knowledge of how to write a claim in Xactimate, so make sure and include the AdjusterPro Tactical Xactimate Training on your resumes and job applications.

  • How much does Xactimate cost?

    The software is available free for a 30-day trial period, and we encourage students to take our course during that time. Please note: your free trial starts as soon as you download the program – not when you start using it. In our experience, Xactware will usually extend your trial period if you call them and request more time. After that, you can purchase the software only through Xactware on a subscription basis. Prices start at $250 a month but vary depending on the length of the subscription, the version you need, and the device (desk, mobile, online) you use. We encourage students to start conservatively when considering an XM8 subscription as some employers will provide laptops with the software already loaded.

  • What can I expect during the live webinar?

    Our webinar uses a program called GoToTraining which allows you to hear the instructor and view their screen as they perform tasks in Xactimate. As a student, you will follow along and perform the same tasks in your free 30-day trial of Xactimate. You can ask questions live through the GoTo chat feature. After you master each task, the instructor proceeds to the next. Using this method, we lead you step-by-step through the entire process of writing an estimate. Our fantastic trainer will make sure and address all questions by the end of the session. 

  • What kind of computer set-up do I need? Do I need two screens?

    A standard computer, either desktop or laptop, will work fine for the course. Once you have purchased and registered for our course, we recommend you install Xactimate on your device and open it to ensure everything is in working order prior to your webinar. While having two screens is not a requirement, it does allow you to keep one screen showing the webinar and instructor’s actions on GoToTraining, while allowing you to continue to work within the XM8 program on the other screen. Please note, most of our students use a single screen and do not report any problems.

  • What do I need to do before class to ensure the software works?

    Once you register for your scheduled webinar, we’ll send you detailed instructions on preparing for your course. Most importantly, you’ll need to install the free trial of the software on your computer and test it to make sure it works prior to your course. This will allow you time to contact the Xactware Support Center should you have any problems with the installation. Remember, the free trial starts when you download the course, not when you open or begin using it, so keep your scheduled dates in mind and plan accordingly.

  • Can I ask questions and interact with the instructor?

    Absolutely! We are so lucky to have Nadine Bisson teaching our Tactical Xactimate Training Webinar. Nadine has been an independent adjuster since 2008 and is an expert in the claims field. She’s handled hundreds, maybe thousands of claims using Xactimate and knows the program inside and out.

    Most importantly, Nadine is an excellent trainer. Throughout your course, she’ll answer all your questions and take time to make sure that you’re comfortable with the material.

  • Do you offer any reference material with the course?

    Yes. When you go through our training, you will receive our Xactimate Exercise Manual with hours of practice roofs, elevations, and rooms of increasing complexity. Our instructors will be available to assist if you have questions about these ongoing practice exercises.

  • What happens after I complete my Xactimate Course?

    AdjusterPro’s Xactimate Course is recognized by employers as valuable training so make sure to list it on your resume and applications. With a license in one hand and Xactimate in the other, you are ready to go to work!

    Our course is also approved for continuing education (CE) hours in key states. If you were licensed before you took our Xactimate course, contact the support team to have them submit CE credit hours on your behalf. For more information on which states qualify and the submission process, please visit our AdjusterPro Xactimate page.

    If you would like pursue your Xactimate Certification through Xactware, details are available on the Xactimate Training Website.

  • How much time does it take to download the 30-day trial Xactimate software?

    It can take anywhere from 2-6 hours to download and install Xactimate, and you can only use the demo software for 30 days. It is important to note that your free trial starts as soon as you download the software so please plan accordingly with an eye on your scheduled training dates.

  • How do I confirm my webinar training dates?

    Once you complete the “Xactimate Training Prerequisites” module, you will be directed to the “Xactimate Webinar” module to choose your webinar dates. Come back to this module to access the webinar during your scheduled time.

  • How do I download or order Xactimate?

    You will order and download the demo directly from Xactware’s website. You’ll need a computer that runs Windows and meets the Xactimate system requirements. You can find a complete list of requirements and instructions for download on the Xactimate System Requirements page.  Instructions are also available in the ‘Xactimate Training Prerequisites’ section of your course.

  • How do I download the Xactimate Exercise Book for class?

    The exercise book is available for download and printing a hard copy is optional. You’ll receive instructions on how to access the exercise book within your online classroom. It can also be found under ‘Additional References’ on the right-hand side of your course homepage.

    **Please make sure you have this book handy and ready for use prior to the start of your class.

  • Can I reschedule my webinar?

    Yes. If you need to reschedule your session, simply log back into your “Schedule: Tactical Xactimate Training” module and select ‘Reregister.’ From there, you will be able to choose your new session dates.

  • What is the difference between Xactimate 28 and X1?

    Xactware, the software developer, recently released a new version of Xactimate called X1. X1 is basically a cloud-based version of Xactimate 28, which is what most adjusters have been using for years. The two versions look and function in very much the same way, and our webinar has been updated to include addressing both versions of the software when necessary. If you want to read more about the different versions, and what it means for adjusters, please read our Xactimate Training: 28 vs X1 article.

  • What is online proctoring?

    Some states will allow you to take your pre-licensing or licensing exam online (AL, AR, IN, FL, TX, MS) as long as you have a ‘disinterested third-party’ present to oversee the exam. The third-party, or proctor, can not be a member of your family or a co-worker that either works above or below your position.

    Online proctoring is essentially the same thing except the proctor is watching you take your exam online through your computer video camera instead of in person. We’ve partnered with Proctor Free to offer this service to our students at no additional cost.

    Once you finish your course and get to the exam, our online classroom will give you a few basic guidelines for taking the exam and walk you through simple steps to set up the online proctoring system.

    This allows you to proceed with the exam on your own time without needing to schedule an in-person proctor to oversee your test…and it’s all at no extra charge to you.

    You do not have to use online proctoring for the state exams where it is offered. Students can choose to test with a standard in-person proctor or use our online proctoring system.

  • What is the difference in the Total Package versus Essential?

    Our Adjuster Essentials offers the single course you need for your state. For some states it’s the required pre-licensing course and for others, it is an exam prep course. Either way, the essentials will prepare you to ace your state’s adjuster licensing exam.

    The Total Adjuster Package includes your state’s exam prep or pre-licensing course as well as additional training to help prepare you for the job itself. Having this knowledge before you start will mean you can get hired and start closing claims (and making money!) faster. The Xactimate Live Webinar will teach you how to work a claim from start to finish so you can hit the ground running when you get assigned those first claims. Our Getting Work Master Series is a one-of-a-kind video series hosted by our co-founder and veteran adjuster, Adam Gardiner. He shares an inside look at how independent adjusting firms work and tips on how to get noticed and get hired. Lastly, our Roofing 101 will walk you through the basics of roofing terminology, construction, and types of claims.

  • Why should I choose AdjusterPro?

    Our team is passionate about providing the best insurance training courses and online classroom experience in the industry. We are committed to helping you succeed at every step of your adjusting career.

    At AdjusterPro, we believe in serving our customers with transparency, honesty, and adhering to the Golden Rule, treating others as we would want to be treated.

    Building our company upon these principles, here are a few other ways we differentiate from the competition:

    • We offer over 170 courses – the most comprehensive catalog in the country
    • Our simple, engaging online training was created to help you comprehend and retain information
    • Keeping your license compliant is simple with our convenient continuing education courses
    • You’ll receive honest answers from our dedicated (real-people) customer engagement team
    • 50 states strong: we offer a path to licensing for every state
    • Over 50,000 people have trained with us
    • 8 of the country’s top 10 insurance carriers train with AdjusterPro
    • 98.4% customer satisfaction rating
    • AdjusterPro is more than just online courses. We’re the nation’s go-to resource for all things adjuster. Whether it’s licensing, reciprocity, CE, networking, tips of the trade, or career advice, we’ve got you covered.

    Whether you are just starting to explore the insurance claims industry, a Fortune 500 company, or are a veteran adjuster looking for additional training, we are here to help you reach your goals and achieve success.

  • How long will it take for my CE to be submitted to the state?

    Please allow 3 business days for CE credits to appear on your transcript. Credits will be submitted using the date on your Certificate of Completion.

     

  • What is Quiz Builder?

    Quiz Builder is a study tool included in our courses. It lets you build custom quizzes using questions from any of the cumulative lesson quizzes throughout your course.

    Quiz Builder will automatically build a quiz made of all the questions you got wrong in the quizzes you select, but you can choose to include questions that you had previously answered correctly as well. The answers and feedback will be displayed each time you answer a question, or you have the option to hide the answers until the end of the quiz.

  • What is the time limit for completing the course?

    In general, there is no time limit to complete your course. It will be available to you in your online classroom until it is complete.

  • What do I need to get on the quizzes to pass? How many times can I take the lessons and quizzes?

    You must receive a 70% on each quiz to pass and move ahead to the next module. You can review each lesson and take each quiz as many times as you like — it will not affect your overall grade or hinder your completion of the course in any way. Your individual quiz scores will be listed next to each module once completed.

  • How many times can I take the practice exams?

    Our practice exams are set up to simulate the actual state exam. You can take the practice exams as many times as you would like.
    After completing a practice exam, you will have the option to Retake the Test, Review All Question Results, or Review All Unanswered Questions. If you want to review your results, you must do so before continuing to the next page in the course, since once you continue the practice exam will be reset.

    We recommend achieving a 90% on your practice exam before moving on to take your state exam.

  • Once I have completed the course, how do I schedule my State Exam?

    Every AdjusterPro course includes state-specific instructions for scheduling and taking your state exam. You can also find step-by-step instructions for getting your license (including how to register for the state exam) on your state’s page. Visit our Courses page, type in your state, and scroll down to ‘How to Get Licensed’ to see specific instructions for your state.

    Students who complete our exam preparation courses will need to register to take the state exam through their state’s testing provider: either PSI, PearsonVue, or Prometric.

    Pre-licensing students will receive instructions on how to take the state exam, which is included in your AdjusterPro course*, within the course itself.

    *For Georgia, Mississippi, and North Carolina students — while our courses satisfy the state’s pre-licensing requirement, students must register for and take the state exam through a test provider.

  • Is there a breakdown of the types of questions on the state exam?

    We use each state’s exam content outline, including the percentage of questions in each subject, to create every AdjusterPro course. If you would like to see a detailed breakdown of topics in the state exam, visit the testing provider’s website and follow the prompts to your state’s insurance exam content outlines and look for the adjuster exam.

  • What happens when I submit feedback?

    We read it, of course! When you submit feedback, leave a review, or send us an email, it goes to our customer support team who diligently looks at every one. We are always trying to improve your experience with AdjusterPro, both in and out of our online classroom. We appreciate honest feedback from our students on what’s working, or what we could do better on. To help our team be as efficient as possible, we ask all students to add the title of the slide they are on when submitting their feedback within a course. This helps us be able to identify exactly where you were within a module when you gave us feedback.

  • Do you offer a “satisfaction guarantee?”

    So glad you asked! We offer a 100%, no nonsense satisfaction guarantee on all our courses. We are confident that you will be completely satisfied with our courses, or you will receive a full refund*, as long as you request it within 30 days of your purchase. *Very limited fine print for IN and AL customers: If you took the Indiana or Alabama state exam as part of your course, we will refund your purchase price less $100, because the states of Indiana and Alabama don’t allow us to refund the mandatory $100 exam fee.

  • How will I get my Certificate of Completion?

    Once your course is 100% complete, your Certificate of Completion will be available in your online classroom.

  • What is a “Monitor”?

    A Monitor is a person who must sit with you during your exam to confirm that you complete it without notes or an open book. Most AdjusterPro pre-licensing courses require a Monitor to be present when you take your exam in order to comply with state regulations. The Monitor must be at least 18 years old and cannot be an immediate family member or a subordinate at your workplace.

  • What is an “Affidavit of Witness”?

    An “Affidavit of Witness” is a document completed by you and your monitor verifying that you took the exam without help from outside individuals or materials. This document must be signed by both the student and the monitor in the presence of a notary (who then notarizes the form), and then uploaded to your online classroom for AdjusterPro to review. Not every state requires an affidavit of witness but your AdjusterPro course will provide instructions if it is required for your state.

  • Can I use a tablet to take my course? What about a smartphone?

    Our courses were built to work on all iPads and tablets. Layouts, scrolling, and displays will vary depending on the device you have, and performance will vary depending on the browser the device uses. Our courses are fully HTML5 compatible so you can experience the course on your smartphone as well.

    This makes working on your course possible wherever you go!

    However, for the best experience, we still recommend a desktop or laptop. This is especially important when taking your exam as you’ll want to make sure you have reliable wifi and are in a location where you can concentrate.

  • What are some best practices and study tips for taking an online course?

    Being able to study anywhere, at any time, is one of the best parts of taking a class online. But e-learning does come with its own set of challenges. When, where, how long, and how much you study all play an important role in getting the most out of your online courses. We created a two-part blog series detailing some of our best advice and practices on how to be a successful online student.

    Succeeding as an Online Student Part I

    Succeeding as an Online Student Part II

  • Computer

    Your course will perform best on a desktop or laptop computer that is less than 3 years old. Either a PC or a Mac will work well. While not a requirement, the course is best viewed using a minimum screen resolution of 1024 x 768.

  • Preferred Browser

    Web Browsers

    We support the current and the previous major release of Chrome, Firefox, Safari, and Microsoft browsers. This currently includes Microsoft Edge and Internet Explorer. Each time a new browser version is released, we begin supporting that version and stop supporting the third most recent version.

    Mobile Browsers

    • Current and previous Android versions
    • Current and previous iOS versions
  • Is Internet access required?

    Yes, an internet connection is required to log in and view your online course. AdjusterPro courses offer a range of multimedia features, and we recommend that you have a good broadband or network connection for the best experience.

  • How can I troubleshoot audio and video problems?

    If you have problems with the audio in your course, we recommend that you check your internet connection and reset if necessary; clear your cache; and update your browser or try another browser.

    Additionally, check your speaker/headphone connection and your audio system preferences.

    If you have problems viewing a video in your course, we recommend that you check your internet connection and reset if necessary; clear your cache; and update your browser or try another browser.

    You may find this instruction helpful: http://wistia.com/doc/troubleshooting#playback

    Overall, it is a good idea to clear out your search history, cookies, and cache regularly. You can find instructions on how to clear your cache here.

  • How do I find or reset my password?

    If you can’t find your password or want to reset it, visit the login page and click on “Forgot Your Password?” In the next box, enter the email address associated with your course. You will receive an email with a link that will allow you to set a new password.

  • Porque debo escoger AdjusterPro?

    La pasión de nuestro equipo es poder proveer el mejor entrenamiento y experiencia en cursos en línea de la industria. Estamos comprometidos en ayudarle en cada paso en su carrera en aseguranzas.

    En AdjusterPro, creemos en tratar a nuestros clientes con transparencia, honestidad, y siempre teniendo en mente de tratar a otros como quisiéramos ser tratados.

    • Ofrecemos mas de 70 cursos, los más compresivos en el país
    • Simples, y interactivos creados para ayudarle a comprender y retener información
    • Clases en linea breves
    • Conformidad fácil con nuestros cursos de educación continua
    • Respuestas honestas de nuestro equipo de representante al cliente con (personas-reales) y dedicadas
    • Con 50 estados, ofrecemos el camino para su licencia en cada estado
    • Hemos entrenado a mas de 50,000 personas
    • 8 de las 10 mejores agencias de aseguranzas entrenadas por AP
    • 98.4% de satisfacción por clientes
    • El mejor recurso en todo perteneciente de conformidad, las redes, consejos del trabajo, y otra información valiosa perteneciente de la industria de aseguranzas

    Si es alguien explorando el campo de aseguranzas, una compañía de 500, o un veterano en aseguranzas buscando más entrenamiento, estamos aquí para ayudarle en alcanzar sus metas y éxito.

  • Cuales son los cursos de estudios continuos y requisitos para renovar la licencia 4-40?

    La licencia 4-40 debe ser renovada cada 2 años. Mientras no hay una cuota para renovar su licencia, cada persona con esta licencia tiene que tomar y completar un curso de 10 horas y procesarlo con el estado para permanecer en norma. 

    Las 10 horas de educación continua deben de consistir en 5-horas de reglas y éticas renovadas de la Florida y 5 horas adicionales de créditos electivos. 

    Nosotros actualmente no ofrecemos los cursos de educación continua para la licencia 4-40 de la Florida. 

    Para ver los detalles completos de como renovar su licencia y buscar cursos aprobados, puede visitar la página de finanzas de la Florida Florida Department of Insurance 4-40 Website Page. También puede llamar al departamento al (850) 413-3137 o escribir a  agentlicensing@myfloridacfo.com.

    Todavía tiene preguntas? 

    Nos puede llamar al (214) 329-9030 o a nuestra representante bilingüe en español al (214) 385-2010 también nos puede escribir a info@adjusterpro.com

    Es nuestro placer ayudarle!

  • Hay posibilidades de crecimiento con la licencia 4-40?

    La respuesta simple: SI!

    Hoy en dia, aseguranza está en cada aspecto de nuestras vidas. La industria es una de las más grandes en el mundo y emplea millones de personas en cientos de trabajos y partes. No importa cual sea su interés, es muy probable que hay una posición en la industria que le convenga a sus talentos. 

    En la escala más pequeña, la licencia 4-40 es una buena forma de entrar en esta industria retumbante. Trabajando como un representante al cliente podrá aprender más sobre la industria y las normas de las aseguranzas y experiencia si quisiera ser un agente de tiempo completo. Ya que complete su curso y haya trabajado como un representante al cliente con su licencia 4-40 por un año, califica para aplicar para la licencia 2-20 agente licenciado general. En comparación, alguien que no tenga su licencia 4-40 tiene que tomar un curso de 200-horas y aprobar el examen de el estado antes de aplicar.  

  • Cuánto cuesta para aplicar para la licencia 4-40?

    Ya que complete nuestro curso de Representante al Cliente 4-40 de la Florida, y apruebe el examen incluido, tendrá que pagar las próximas cuotas:  

    • Cuota de la licencia y el proceso: $50
    • Numero de licencia: $5
    • Proceso de huellas: $48.55
  • Cual es el proceso para aplicar para la licencia 4-40?

    Para aplicar para su licencia 4-40, primero tiene que completar un curso requerido y pre-aprobado por el estado, usualmente referido como “designación.” Nuestro curso de designación es titulado CIR cual significa Representante al Cliente de Aseguranza. 

    Ya que complete su curso, estará listo para aplicar para su licencia 4-40. 

  • Cual es la parte de un Representante al Cliente?

    Como un representante al cliente, manejara muchas de las funciones de los agentes o de la agencia. Puede discutir las normas y coberturas con clientes, responder sus preguntas, estar encargado de información personal de clientes y clientes potenciales, o hacer cambios a normas. Representantes al cliente también pueden vender aseguranzas tal cuando estén supervisados por un agente licenciado. Otras responsabilidades de un representante al cliente incluye, mantener buenas relaciones con asegurados, vender coberturas adicionales, y animar a los clientes que refieran a familiares y amigos.

    Un representante al cliente es visto como la “cara” de una agencia ya que son ellos quien interactúan con asegurados y con asegurados potenciales todos los días. Pueden tener un impacto enorme en la satisfacción y retención de un cliente (cual es la meta de cualquier aseguranza) por eso son muy importantes. Representantes al cliente también pueden ganar comisiones  siempre y cuando las comisiones no excedan más de la mitad de un sueldo anual.

  • Quien necesita la licencia 4-40?

    Esta licencia es requerida para trabajar en casi todas las agencias de aseguranza en la Florida. Es diseñada para trabajadores con salario fijo, no para agentes o agentes comerciales que ganan la mayoría de su sueldo con comisión de ventas. La licencia 4-40 le permite dar cuotas, explicar normas al cliente, y proveer importante asistencia al agente de ventas.