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Choose Your Home State

See where you can get a reciprocal license and learn more about your state's rules.

A Method. To The Licensing Madness.

Understanding reciprocity is vital if you want to make the most of your adjusting career. To put it plainly, the more licenses you hold, the better. Obtaining reciprocal licenses makes you more attractive to employers, increases your revenue, and allows you to help wherever you’re needed.

Licensing Versus Non-Licensing States

If you live in a licensing state, you need to get your home state license first. Most states will only offer reciprocal licensing privileges to adjusters who hold their home or designated home state license.

Select a state below to learn more.

  • LICENSING STATE
  • NON-LICENSING STATE
NY CA OK TX LA AR MS AL MO KS GA FL SC NC TN KY VA WV IL IN OH PA VT NH MA CT ME RI DE NJ MD IA WI MI MN NE SD ND NM CO WY MT UT AZ HI NV ID OR AK WA

Reciprocity
Recommended.

“Because of the training I received, along with their recommendations for reciprocal licenses, I had my pick of multiple employers. I owe my entire career to AdjusterPro.”

Evan Mason, Independent Adjuster

Frequently Asked Questions

  • What is reciprocity?

    Reciprocity, or reciprocal licensing privileges, allows a licensed adjuster to obtain another state(s) license without having to pass that specific state’s exam. Thank goodness, right? Once you have your home state or DHS license, you can apply for other state licenses through reciprocity.

    It’s not automatic – you will need to complete the required paperwork and submit the licensing fees but most licensing states are now reciprocal with each other. There are some caveats – New York and California do not reciprocate with any other state for example. To learn what states will offer you a reciprocal license, visit the AdjusterPro Reciprocity Map and click on your state.

  • How does getting reciprocal licenses help me?

    The bottom line: the more licenses you have, the better. Whether it’s an insurance carrier or an independent adjusting firm, employers need adjusters who can work whenever and wherever claims happen. And you can only do that if you have the proper license for that state.

    For example, employers may need to send hundreds of adjusters to Florida after a hurricane. The company checks their roster and adjusters who hold a Florida license are first in line for deployment. But the large number of adjusters sent to Florida leaves holes for the daily claims that will still need to be handled in states like Georgia and Mississippi. So now they need to find adjusters who are licensed in those states to come in and work. You get the idea….

    Bottom Line: being licensed in multiple states will make you more attractive to employers, increase your revenue, and allow you to help wherever you are needed.

  • What if my home state doesn’t license? What is a DHS license?

    If you live in a non-licensing state, you should obtain a “Designated Home State” or DHS license. A DHS license basically works just like having your home state license and is vital if you want to work any claims outside of your non-licensing state. If you live in Kansas for example, you can adjust claims there without a license, but you can’t go work claims in Florida or Texas. While a host of different states offer a DHS license, we recommend obtaining the Florida 70-20 Nonresident DHS license. It offers great reciprocity and Florida has the quickest application turnaround time in the country.

    States that do not currently license adjusters: Colorado, District of Columbia, Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Maryland, Missouri, Nebraska, New Jersey, North Dakota, Ohio, Pennsylvania, South Dakota, Tennessee, Virginia, and Wisconsin.

  • Which state offers the best reciprocity?

    This is one of the most common misconceptions about reciprocity. Too often, adjusters believe or hear from someone else that some states enjoy more reciprocity than others (e.g. Texas is reciprocal with 32 states!). That may have been true once upon a time, but in today’s industry, reciprocity is predicated not on what state license you have but on whether it’s your home state license. So if you want to enjoy reciprocal licensing privileges, you need to hold your home state license first. It’s that simple.

  • How do I get reciprocal licenses?

    Just because your home state is reciprocal with another does not mean you can just hop across state lines and begin working claims. You need to apply for the reciprocal license and pay the state’s fees. Obtaining reciprocal licenses will cost you anywhere from $55 – $175 per state for the application fees, plus the time it takes to complete all the necessary paperwork; usually about a day or two. Most states’ applications can be completed and submitted online from either NIPR or Sircon.